Department of

Mathematics


Seminar Calendar
for events the day of Wednesday, November 16, 2005.

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Wednesday, November 16, 2005

3:00 pm in 441 Altgeld Hall,Wednesday, November 16, 2005

Topology of algebraic varieties

Christian Haesemeyer (UIUC Math)

Abstract: Projective algebraic varieties have many special topological properties. In this talk, we will explore some of these properties of complex projective manifolds and present some of their applications (like the classification of the homotopy types of complete interesections of hypersurfaces). Time allowing, we will also look at the topology of varieties defined over subfields of the complex numbers (for example, the homotopy type of their complex points depends on the choice of embedding of the subfield, even though the homology type does not).

4:00 pm in 245 Altgeld Hall,Wednesday, November 16, 2005

The Math behind Oscillator-Wave Systems

Eduard Kirr (Dept. of Mathematics, UIUC)

Abstract: Oscillator-wave systems are now ubiquitous in science, however, their evolution is far from being completely understood. I will exemplify with two models. First is related with mechanical experiments you might have done in your physics classes, the second is related with current experimental work on Bose-Einstein Condensates. I will try to gently introduce the modern analysis needed to study the two. But the conclusion will be that we need far more mathematical tools to attack more general oscillator-wave systems.