Department of

Mathematics


Seminar Calendar
for events the day of Monday, January 23, 2006.

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Questions regarding events or the calendar should be directed to Tori Corkery.
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Monday, January 23, 2006

2:00 pm in 143 Altgeld Hall,Monday, January 23, 2006

Elementary C*-theory

F. Boca (UIUC)

Abstract: We continue 4-5pm in room 347

3:00 pm in Siebel Center 3405,Monday, January 23, 2006

Organizational Meeting

R. Ghrist (UIUC Math)

Abstract: This semester's AIMS will be joint with the Computer Science department, and will emphasize applications of geometry, topology, logic, and combinatorics in computer science. Note the location in the Siebel Center. Graduate students are particularly encouraged to attend.

3:00 pm in Room TBA,Monday, January 23, 2006

Introduction to Quantum Mechanics

Sheldon Katz   [email] (UIUC Math and Physics)

Abstract: This is an idiosyncratic introduction to quantum mechanics, formulated as a warm-up to quantum string theory.

4:00 pm in 245 Altgeld Hall,Monday, January 23, 2006

Contact geometry, holomorphic curves, and topology

Lenhard L. Ng (Stanford University )

Abstract: I will discuss a program for studying smooth manifolds and submanifolds using contact geometry. By counting holomorphic curves in certain canonical contact manifolds associated to these smooth objects, one obtains smooth invariants that are quite strong. I will describe one consequence of this program, a knot invariant called knot contact homology, and examine its properties. Hosts: E. Kerman and G. Francis