Department of

Mathematics


Seminar Calendar
for events the day of Wednesday, September 3, 2014.

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Wednesday, September 3, 2014

2:00 pm in 441 Altgeld Hall,Wednesday, September 3, 2014

An Introduction to Arithmetic Geometry: Part II

Nathan Fieldsteel   [email] (UIUC Math)

Abstract: A continuation of last week's talk, we will continue the discussion of geometry over finite fields, covering $q$-binomial coefficients, connections to algebraic combinatorics, and $\mathbb{F}_1$ geometry.

4:00 pm in 245 Altgeld Hall,Wednesday, September 3, 2014

Host mortality and disease spread

Zoi Rapti (Department of Mathematics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)

Abstract: We will introduce a coupled PDE-ODE system that describes the interactions between the susceptible (S) and infected (I) hosts, the pathogen (Z) that affects them and the food resource (A) of both classes of hosts. The model is a 4-dimensional system of 3 ODES and 1 PDE. We are interested in investigating the effect of host mortality (such as background mortality, disease induced mortality, predation) on the disease dynamics (equilibrium vs. oscillations) and metrics of disease such as the basic reproductive number R0 and prevalence. We will discuss the stability and bifurcations of the system and show that the interplay among the various types of mortality generates interesting behavior in our model. All biological terms will be defined, so no prior knowledge from biology is required. Introductory graduate ODE and PDE courses suffice for this talk.