Department of

Mathematics


Seminar Calendar
for events the day of Friday, October 28, 2016.

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Friday, October 28, 2016

2:00 pm in 443 Altgeld Hall,Friday, October 28, 2016

Measurable versions of the Lovász Local Lemma and measurable graph colorings, Part V

Anton Bernshteyn (UIUC Math)

Abstract: We will continue working through the paper "Measurable versions of the Lovász Local Lemma and measurable graph colorings" by Anton Bernshteyn.

4:00 pm in 345 Altgeld Hall,Friday, October 28, 2016

First order expansions of the reals

Erik Walsberg (UIUC Math)

Abstract: We discuss what we understand of the classification of first order expansions of $(\mathbb{R},<,+)$ according to the topology and geometry of their definable sets.

4:00 pm in 241 Altgeld Hall,Friday, October 28, 2016

Colimits: Building Things out of small Pieces

Nima Rasekh (UIUC Math)

Abstract: n this talk we discuss one concept that shows up basically everywhere, but under different names: Colimits. The talk will mostly focus on different examples of colimits in different areas of mathematics (such as algebra and topology) and how they can be used to relate concepts that previously seemed unrelated. The only prerequisite is a healthy dose of mathematical curiosity and an appetite for cookies. In particular, no previous knowledge of category theory is assumed.