Department of

Mathematics


Seminar Calendar
for events the day of Wednesday, September 19, 2018.

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                        30                                         

Wednesday, September 19, 2018

3:00 pm in 241 Altgeld Hall,Wednesday, September 19, 2018

On "Closed subgroups generated by generic measure automorphisms" by S. Solecki, Part 3

Dakota Ihli (UIUC Math)

Abstract: We will sketch the proof of the main result in this paper.

4:00 pm in 2 Illini Hall,Wednesday, September 19, 2018

Window equivalences and spherical functors

Jesse Huang   [email] (UIUC Math)

Abstract: We will appreciate some recent results on the derived categories of GIT quotients through the basic example of a flip/flop.

4:00 pm in 245 Altgeld Hall,Wednesday, September 19, 2018

Women in Math, widening roads

Moira Chas (Stony Brook University (SUNY))

Abstract: Imagine you grew up in a society where your teachers believed -consciously or not- that one of the features defining your kind of people is not being good at math. Imagine you had a Barbie who said: “Math class is tough. Will we ever have enough clothes? I love shopping.” Now expand your vision so you can see daily occurrences of events like those, imagine those events populating your mind since you were born -- slowly, persistently and insidiously. Imagine that the praises to your beauty are many more than those to your mind. Imagine you are rewarded when you are nice, and punished when you are not… For most of us, it is not hard to imagine such a society, because we grew up in one like that. In this talk, I will reason about different ways of how overcome these obstacles and what can we all do to change our mindsets so more of us can enjoy and apply the wonders of math. Most of this discussion also applies to other underrepresented groups in math. If you are able, please consider staying after the talk for an informal discussion from 5-6pm expanding on the talk, and how topics raised relate and intersect with the experiences of other underrepresented groups in math.