Department of

Mathematics


Seminar Calendar
for events the day of Friday, October 26, 2018.

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Questions regarding events or the calendar should be directed to Tori Corkery.
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Friday, October 26, 2018

12:00 pm in Room 1005, Beckman Institute,Friday, October 26, 2018

BIO-LOGIC: Biological Computation Beyond the Turing Limit

Kay Kirkpatrick (Illinois Mathematics)

Abstract: Kay Kirkpatrick, an associate professor of mathematics, will discuss “BIO-LOGIC: Biological Computation Beyond the Turing Limit” at noon, Friday, Oct. 26, in room 1005 of the Beckman Institute. The talk is part of the institute’s Curious and Eclectic Seminar Series. Lunch will be provided.

1:00 pm in 2 Illini Hall,Friday, October 26, 2018

Hodge theory and singularities I

Sungwoo Nam

Abstract: In this talk, I will describe classical Hodge theory on compact Kahler manifolds and discuss its application to geometry of complex manifolds, such as hard Lefschetz theorem and Lefschetz (1,1) theorem. Then I will try to introduce(or at least motivate, if time does not permit) extension of pure Hodge theory needed to study singularities, mixed Hodge structures and variation of Hodge structures.

3:00 pm in 345 Altgeld Hall,Friday, October 26, 2018

TBA

Emiliano Valdez (University of Connecticut)

4:00 pm in 241 Altgeld Hall,Friday, October 26, 2018

A Homotopy Theory Sampler

Brian Shin

Abstract: This will be an expository talk on the what and why of homotopy theory. We'll start with a discussion of homotopy groups and their connection to questions of geometric interest. We'll see some of the techniques used to calculate these, both old and new. With these in hand, we'll hopefull get a glimpse of the intricate patterns hidden in the chaos of unstable homotopy groups. Finally, we'll discuss developing trends and future directions of the field.