Department of

Mathematics


Seminar Calendar
for Mathematics Colloquium -- SPECIAL LECTURE events the year of Tuesday, March 26, 2019.

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More information on this calendar program is available.
Questions regarding events or the calendar should be directed to Tori Corkery.
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Friday, February 15, 2019

4:00 pm in 245 Altgeld Hall,Friday, February 15, 2019

Harry Potter's Cloak Via Transformation Optics

Gunther Uhlmann (University of Washington)

Abstract: Can we make objects invisible? This has been a subject of human fascination for millennia in Greek mythology, movies, science fiction, etc. including the legend of Perseus versus Medusa and the more recent Star Trek and Harry Potter. In the last fifteen years or so there have been several scientific proposals to achieve invisibility. We will introduce in a non-technical fashion one of them, the so-called "transformation optics" which has received a lot of attention in the scientific community.

Monday, February 18, 2019

4:00 pm in 245 Altgeld Hall,Monday, February 18, 2019

Cohomology of Shimura Varieties

Sug Woo Shin (University of California Berkeley)

Abstract: Shimura varieties are a certain class of algebraic varieties over number fields with lots of symmetries, introduced by Shimura and Deligne nearly half a century ago. They have been playing a central role in number theory and other areas. Langlands proposed a program to compute the L-functions and cohomology of Shimura varieites in 1970s; this was refined by Langlands-Rapoport and Kottwitz in 1980s. I will review some old and recent results in this direction.

Wednesday, February 20, 2019

4:00 pm in 245 Altgeld Hall,Wednesday, February 20, 2019

Some necessary uses of logic in mathematics

Ilijas Farah (York University)

Abstract: Every now and then, a difficult mathematical problem turns out to be difficult for a particularly objective reason: Provably, it cannot be solved by using 'conventional' means. Some classical examples are proving the Continuum Hypothesis, trisecting an angle, and solving the quintic equation. Iíll discuss more recent examples of such problems, giving some emphasis to the problems arising from the study of operator algebras.