Department of

Mathematics


Seminar Calendar
for events the day of Friday, January 31, 2020.

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Questions regarding events or the calendar should be directed to Tori Corkery.
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Friday, January 31, 2020

3:00 pm in 347 Altgeld Hall,Friday, January 31, 2020

Indroduction to Non Commutative Probability

Kesav Krishnan (UIUC Math)

Abstract: In this talk I will introduce Non Commutative Probability Theory, and highlight some of its uses in classical Probability, such as the study of random matrices. In particular, motivation of Wigner's semi-circle law as the non commutative analog of the Central Limit Theorem.

4:00 pm in 341 Altgeld Hall,Friday, January 31, 2020

What Is A Mathematics?

Robert Joseph Rennie   [email] (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)

Abstract: In this talk, I will begin with a mathematization of the process of mathematization. We will then see how category theory and type theory provide a nice general framework for constructing and comparing systems of math. This discussion will motivate, without ever mentioning topological spaces, the study of higher toposes to anyone who cares about theoretical physics (not necessarily just those who study it). This talk requires only an interest in thinking about how math works.

4:00 pm in 141 Altgeld Hall,Friday, January 31, 2020

Introduction to Orbifolds

Brannon Basilio (UIUC)

Abstract: We can generalize the notion of a manifold to include singularities; thus we can define a new object called orbifolds. In this talk, we will give an introduction to the notion of orbifolds, including examples, covering orbifold, Euler number of an orbifold, and the classification theorem of 2-orbifolds.