Department of

Mathematics


Seminar Calendar
for events the day of Wednesday, April 29, 2020.

     .
events for the
events containing  

(Requires a password.)
More information on this calendar program is available.
Questions regarding events or the calendar should be directed to Tori Corkery.
      March 2020             April 2020              May 2020      
 Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa   Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa   Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa
  1  2  3  4  5  6  7             1  2  3  4                   1  2
  8  9 10 11 12 13 14    5  6  7  8  9 10 11    3  4  5  6  7  8  9
 15 16 17 18 19 20 21   12 13 14 15 16 17 18   10 11 12 13 14 15 16
 22 23 24 25 26 27 28   19 20 21 22 23 24 25   17 18 19 20 21 22 23
 29 30 31               26 27 28 29 30         24 25 26 27 28 29 30
                                               31                  

Wednesday, April 29, 2020

2:00 pm in Zoom Meeting,Wednesday, April 29, 2020

Extremal problems on special graph colorings

Xujun Liu (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)

Abstract: Adviser: Alexandr Kostochka Committee: Jozsef Balogh (Chair), Alexandr Kostochka, Mikhail Lavrov, Olgica Milenkovic, and Douglas West Abstract: In this thesis, we study several extremal problems on graph colorings. In particular, we study monochromatic connected matchings, paths, and cycles in 2-edge colored graphs, packing colorings of subcubic graphs, and directed intersection number of digraphs. Please email Jozsef Balogh (jobal@illinois.edu) or Peggy Currid (currid@illinois.edu) for Zoom link, meeting ID, and password.

3:30 pm in https://illinois.zoom.us/j/806582029 (email Anush Tserunyan for password),Wednesday, April 29, 2020

Descriptive combinatorics, distributed algorithms, and the Lovász Local Lemma: proofs

Anton Bernshteyn (CMU Math)

Abstract: Descriptive combinatorics is the study of combinatorial problems (such as graph coloring) under additional topological or measure-theoretic regularity restrictions. It turns out that there is a close relationship between descriptive combinatorics and distributed computing, i.e., the area of computer science concerned with problems that can be solved efficiently by a decentralized network of processors. At the heart of this relationship lies the Lovász Local Lemma—an important tool in probabilistic combinatorics—and its measurable versions. In this talk I will sketch the arguments behind this relationship.