Department of

Mathematics


Seminar Calendar
for events the day of Thursday, May 7, 2020.

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More information on this calendar program is available.
Questions regarding events or the calendar should be directed to Tori Corkery.
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Thursday, May 7, 2020

9:00 am in 245 Altgeld Hall,Thursday, May 7, 2020

Final Presentation

Students (U of I)

10:00 am in 245 Altgeld Hall,Thursday, May 7, 2020

Final Presentations

students (U of I)

11:00 am in 245 Altgeld Hall,Thursday, May 7, 2020

Final Presentations

students (U of I)

12:00 pm in 245 Altgeld Hall,Thursday, May 7, 2020

Final Presentations

students (U of I)

1:00 pm in 245 Altgeld Hall,Thursday, May 7, 2020

Final Presentations

students (U of I)

2:00 pm in 245 Altgeld Hall,Thursday, May 7, 2020

Final Presentations

students (U of I)

4:00 pm in 245 Altgeld Hall,Thursday, May 7, 2020

To Be Rescheduled Fall 2020

Sami Assaf   [email] (University of Southern California)

Abstract: To come.

5:00 pm in Online (see abstract for details),Thursday, May 7, 2020

Improving societal governance in the age of AI

Wendy K. Tam Cho   [email] (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)

Abstract: Important insights into societal governance can be gained through an interdisciplinary approach that combines research from many fields, including statistics, operations research, computer science, high performance computing, math, law, and political science. My work integrates insights from all of these disciplines to create a novel approach for analyzing and reforming the redistricting process in the United States. While the development of these computational algorithms is important, understanding the role of this technology and managing its use is critical to improving societal governance in the digital age. To register: https://mailchi.mp/fields.utoronto.ca/2020keyfitzlecture?e=fa128d01a4