Department of

Mathematics


Seminar Calendar
for events the year of Thursday, July 2, 2020.

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More information on this calendar program is available.
Questions regarding events or the calendar should be directed to Tori Corkery.
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Tuesday, January 14, 2020

11:00 am in 241 Altgeld Hall,Tuesday, January 14, 2020

Superimposing theta structure on a generalized modular relation

Atul Dixit (Indian Institute of Technology in Gandhinagar)

Abstract: By a modular relation for a certain function $F$, we mean that which is governed by the map $z\to -1/z$ but not necessarily by $z\to z+1$. Equivalently, the relation can be written in the form $F(\alpha)=F(\beta)$, where $\alpha\beta=1$. There are many generalized modular relations in the literature such as the general theta transformation $F(w,\alpha)=F(iw, \beta)$ or the Ramanujan-Guinand formula $F(z, \alpha)=F(z, \beta)$ etc. The latter, equivalent to the functional equation of the non-holomorphic Eisenstein series on $\mathrm{SL}_{2}(\mathbb{Z})$, admits a beautiful generalization of the form $F(z, w,\alpha)=F(z, iw, \beta)$, that is, one can superimpose theta structure on it.

Recently, a modular relation involving infinite series of the Hurwitz zeta function $\zeta(z, a)$ was obtained. It generalizes a result of Ramanujan from the Lost Notebook. Can one superimpose theta structure on it? While answering this question affirmatively, we were led to a surprising new generalization of $\zeta(z, a)$. We show that this new zeta function, $\zeta_w(z, a)$, satisfies a beautiful theory. In particular, it is shown that $\zeta_w(z, a)$ can be analytically continued to the whole complex plane except $z=1$. Hurwitz's formula for $\zeta(z, a)$ is also generalized in this setting. We also prove a generalized modular relation involving infinite series of $\zeta_w(z, a)$, which is of the form $F(z, w,\alpha)=F(z, iw, \beta)$. This is joint work with Rahul Kumar.

Friday, January 17, 2020

5:30 pm in Mineral Hall F, Hyatt Regency Denver, Colorado Convention Center,Friday, January 17, 2020

2020 Joint Math Meetings

Abstract: The Department of Mathematics will host a reception during the 2020 Joint Math Meetings (January 15018,2020, Colorado Convention Center). Everyone ever connected with the department is encouraged to get together for conversation and to hear about mathematics at the University of Illinois.

Tuesday, January 21, 2020

1:00 pm in 241 Altgeld Hall,Tuesday, January 21, 2020

Organizational meeting

Abstract: Just a short organizational meeting for Logic seminar and the MT/DST Seminar.

2:00 pm in 243 Altgeld Hall,Tuesday, January 21, 2020

Lichiardopol's Conjecture on Disjoint Cycles in Tournaments

Douglas B. West (Zhejiang Normal University and University of Illinois)

Abstract: In a 1981 survey on cycles in digraphs, Bermond and Thomassen conjectured that every digraph with minimum outdegree at least $2k-1$ contains $k$ disjoint cycles. In 2010, Lichiardopol conjectured a stronger property for tournaments: for positive integers $k$ and $q$ with $q\ge3$, every tournament with minimum out-degree at least $(q-1)k-1$ contains $k$ disjoint cycles of length $q$.

Bang-Jensen, Bessy, and Thomassé [2014] proved the special case of the Bermond--Thomassen Conjecture for tournaments. This implies the case $q=3$ of Lichiardopol's Conjecture. The case $q=4$ was proved in a masters thesis by S. Zhu [2019]. We give a uniform proof for $q\ge5$, thus completing the proof of Lichiardopol's Conjecture. This result is joint work with Fuhong Ma and Jin Yan of Shandong University.

4:00 pm in 245 Altgeld Hall,Tuesday, January 21, 2020

The Helly geometry of some Garside and Artin groups

Jingyin Huang   [email] (Ohio State University)

Abstract: Artin groups emerged from the study of braid groups and complex hyperplane arrangements, and they are connected to Coxeter groups, 3-manifold groups, buildings and many others. Artin groups have very simple presentation, yet rather mysterious geometry with many basic questions widely open. I will present a way of understanding certain Artin groups and Garside groups by building geometric models on which they act. These geometric models are non-positively curved in an appropriate sense, and such curvature structure yields several new results on the algorithmic, topological and geometric aspects of these groups. No previous knowledge on Artin groups or Garside groups is required. This is joint work with D. Osajda.

Wednesday, January 22, 2020

12:00 pm in 141 Altgeld Hall,Wednesday, January 22, 2020

Predictive Actuarial Analystics Using Tree-Based Models

Zhiyu Quan (University of Connecticut)

Abstract: Because of its many advantages, the use of tree-based models has become an increasingly popular alternative predictive tool for building classification and regression models. Innovations to the original methods, such as random forests and gradient boosting, have further improved the capabilities of using tree-based models as a predictive model. Quan et al. (2018) examined the performance of tree-based models for the valuation of the guarantees embedded in variable annuities. We found that tree-based models are generally very efficient in producing more accurate predictions and the gradient boosting ensemble method is considered the most superior. Quan and Valdez (2018) applied multivariate tree-based models to multi-line insurance claims data with correlated responses drawn from the Wisconsin Local Government Property Insurance Fund (LGPIF). We were able to capture the inherent relationship among the response variables and improved marginal predictive accuracy. Quan et al. (2019) propose to use tree-based models with a hybrid structure as an alternative approach to the Tweedie Generalized Linear Model (GLM). This hybrid structure captures the benefits of tuning hyperparameters at each step of the algorithm thereby allowing for an improved prediction accuracy. We examined the performance of this model vis-\`a-vis the Tweedie GLM using the LGPIF and simulated datasets. Our empirical results indicate that this hybrid tree-based model produces more accurate predictions without loss of intuitive interpretation.

2:00 pm in 447 Altgeld Hall,Wednesday, January 22, 2020

Organizational Meeting

Sungwoo Nam (Illinois Math)

Abstract: We will have an organizational meeting for this semester. This involves making a plan for this semester and possibly choose a topic for a reading seminar. If you want to speak this semester, or are interested in a reading seminar, please join us and make a suggestion.

3:00 pm in 243 Altgeld Hall,Wednesday, January 22, 2020

How do mathematicians believe?

Brian P Katz (Smith College)

Abstract: Love it or hate it, many people believe that mathematics gives humans access to a kind of truth that is more absolute and universal than other disciplines. If this claim is true, we must ask: what makes the origins and processes of mathematics special and how can our messy, biological brains connect to the absolute? If the claim is false, then what becomes of truth in mathematics? In this session, we will consider beliefs about truth and how they play out in the mathematics classroom, trying to understand a little about identity, authority, and the Liberal Arts.

3:30 pm in 341 Altgeld Hall,Wednesday, January 22, 2020

Organizational meeting

4:00 pm in 245 Altgeld Hall,Wednesday, January 22, 2020

Statistical reduced models and rigorous analysis for uncertainty quantification of turbulent dynamical systems

Di Qi   [email] (Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences)

Abstract: The capability of using imperfect statistical reduced-order models to capture crucial statistics in turbulent flows is investigated. Much simpler and more tractable block-diagonal models are proposed to approximate the complex and high-dimensional turbulent flow equations. A rigorous statistical bound for the total statistical uncertainty is derived based on a statistical energy conservation principle. The systematic framework of correcting model errors is introduced using statistical response and empirical information theory, and optimal model parameters under this unbiased information measure are achieved in a training phase before the prediction. It is demonstrated that crucial principal statistical quantities in the most important large scales can be captured efficiently with accuracy using the reduced-order model in various dynamical regimes with distinct statistical structures.

Thursday, January 23, 2020

11:00 am in 241 Altgeld Hall,Thursday, January 23, 2020

Heights and p-adic Hodge Theory

Lucia Mocz (University of Chicago)

Abstract: We discuss connections between p-adic Hodge theory and the Faltings height. Most namely, we show how new tools in p-adic Hodge theory can be used to prove new Northcott properties satisfied by the Faltings height, and demonstrate phenomenon which are otherwise predicted by various height conjectures. We will focus primarily on the Faltings height of CM abelian varieties where the theory can be made to be computational and explicit.

2:00 pm in 243 Altgeld Hall,Thursday, January 23, 2020

Free Banach Lattices

Vladimir Troitsky (University of Alberta)

Abstract: A free Banach lattice is the largest Banach lattice generated by a set of given cardinality. Similarly, a Banach lattice $X$ is free over a Banach space $E$ if $X$ is the largest Banach lattice which contains $E$ as a subspace and is generated by it. Equivalently, every bounded linear operator from $E$ to an arbitrary Banach lattice $Y$ extends to a lattice homomorphism from $X$ to $Y$ of the same norm. In the talk, we will discuss several methods of generating free vector and Banach lattices.

3:00 pm in 245 Altgeld Hall,Thursday, January 23, 2020

Application of Random Effects in Dependent Compound Risk Model

Himchan Jeong (University of Connecticut)

Abstract: In ratemaking for general insurance, the calculation of a pure premium has traditionally been based on modeling both frequency and severity in an aggregated claims model. Additionally for simplicity, it has been a standard practice to assume the independence of loss frequency and loss severity. However, in recent years, there has been sporadic interest in the actuarial literature exploring models that departs from this independence. Besides, usual property and casualty insurance enables us to explore the benefits of using random effects for predicting insurance claims observed longitudinally, or over a period of time. Thus, in this article, a research work is introduced with utilizes random effects in dependent two-part model for insurance ratemaking, testing the presence of random effects via Bayesian sensitivity analysis with its own theoretical development as well as empirical results and performance measures using out-of-sample validation procedures.

4:00 pm in 245 Altgeld Hall,Thursday, January 23, 2020

Semistable reduction in characteristic 0

Gaku Liu (Max Planck Institute for Mathematics in the Sciences)

Abstract: Semistable reduction is a relative generalization of the classical problem of resolution of singularities of varieties; the goal is, given a surjective morphism $f : X \to B$ of varieties in characteristic 0, to change $f$ so that it is "as nice as possible". The problem goes back to at least Kempf, Knudsen, Mumford, and Saint-Donat (1973), who proved a strongest possible version when $B$ is a curve. The key ingredient in the proof is the following combinatorial result: Given any $d$-dimensional polytope $P$ with vertices in $\mathbb{Z}^d$, there is a dilation of $P$ which can be triangulated into simplices each with vertices in $\mathbb{Z}^d$ and volume $1/d!$. In 2000, Abramovich and Karu proved, for any base $B$, that $f$ can be made into a weakly semistable morphism $f' : X' \to B'$. They conjectured further that $f'$ can be made semistable, which amounts to making $X'$ smooth. They explained why this is the best resolution of $f$ one might hope for. In this talk I will outline a proof of this conjecture. They key ingredient is a relative generalization of the above combinatorial result of KKMS. I will also discuss some other consequences in combinatorics of our constructions. This is joint work with Karim Adiprasito and Michael Temkin.

Friday, January 24, 2020

3:00 pm in 243 Altgeld Hall,Friday, January 24, 2020

Statistical inference for mortality models

Chen Ling (Georgia State University)

Abstract: Underwriters of annuity products and administrators of pension funds are under financial obligation to their policyholder until the death of counterparty. Hence, the underwriters are subject to longevity risk when the average lifespan of the entire population increases, and yet, such risk can be managed through hedging practices based on parametric mortality models. As a benchmark mortality model in insurance industry is Lee-Carter model, we first summarize some flaws regarding the model and inference methods derived from it. Based on these understandings we propose a modified Lee-Carter model, accompanied by a rigorous statistical inference with asymptotic results and satisfactory numerical and simulation results derived from a small sample. Then we propose bias corrected estimator which is consistent and asymptotically normally distributed regardless of the mortality index being a unit root or stationary AR(1) time series. We further extend the model to accommodate AR(2) process for mortality index, and, a bivariate dataset of U.S. mortality rates. Finally, we conclude by a detailed model validation and some discussions of potential hedging practices based on our parametric model.

3:00 pm in 347 Altgeld Hall,Friday, January 24, 2020

Organizational Meeting

Kesav Krishnan (UIUC Math)

Abstract: This organizational meeting will be to decide on a schedule of speakers. All are welcome

4:00 pm in 141 Altgeld Hall,Friday, January 24, 2020

Organizational Meeting

Nachiketa Adhikari (UIUC)

Abstract: We will draft a schedule of the seminar talks this semester. Please join us and sign up if you want to speak (you don't have to decide on a topic or abstract now). As usual, there will be cookies. All are welcome!

4:00 pm in 245 Altgeld Hall,Friday, January 24, 2020

Logical and geometric tameness over the real line.

Erik Walsberg (University of California, Irvine)

Abstract: There are now a number of important and well-understood examples of logically tame first order structures over the real numbers such as the ordered field of real numbers and the ordered field of real numbers equipped with the exponential function. In these examples subsets of Euclidean space which are (first order) definable are geometrically very well behaved. Recent research had yielded general theorems in this direction. I will discuss one result in this subject: A first order structure on the real line which expands the ordered vector space of real numbers and defines a closed set X such that the topological dimension of X is strictly less then the Hausdorff dimension of X defines every bounded Borel set. Informally: An expansion of the ordered real vector space which defines a fractal is maximally wild from the viewpoint of logic. Joint with Fornasiero and Hieronymi.

Monday, January 27, 2020

2:00 pm in 241 Altgeld Hall,Monday, January 27, 2020

Two-Part D-Vine Copula Models for Longitudinal Insurance Claim Data

Lu Yang (University of Amsterdam)

Abstract: Insurance companies keep track of each policyholder's claims over time, resulting in longitudinal data. Efficient modeling of time dependence in longitudinal claim data can improve the prediction of future claims needed, for example, for ratemaking. Insurance claim data have their special complexity. They usually follow a two-part mixed distribution: a probability mass at zero corresponding to no claim and an otherwise positive claim from a skewed and long-tailed distribution. We propose a two-part D-vine copula model to study longitudinal mixed claim data. We build two stationary D-vine copulas. One is used to model the time dependence in binary outcomes resulting from whether or not a claim has occurred, and the other studies the dependence in the claim size given occurrence over time. The proposed model can predict the probability of making claims and the quantiles of severity given occurrence straightforwardly. We use our approach to investigate a dataset from the Local Government Property Insurance Fund in the state of Wisconsin.

3:00 pm in Altgeld Hall 441,Monday, January 27, 2020

Organizational meeting

William Balderrama (Illinois Math)

3:00 pm in 243 Altgeld Hall,Monday, January 27, 2020

Organizational meeting

Abstract: An organizational meeting to discuss plans for the Spring 2020 semester.

4:00 pm in 245 Altgeld Hall,Monday, January 27, 2020

A new approach to bounding L-functions

Jesse Thorner   [email] (University of Florida)

Abstract: Analytic number theory began with studying the distribution of prime numbers, but it has evolved and grown into a rich subject lying at the intersection of analysis, algebra, combinatorics, and representation theory. Part of its allure lies in its abundance of problems which are tantalizingly easy to state which quickly lead to deep mathematics, much of which revolves around the study of L-functions. These extensions of the elusive Riemann zeta function $\zeta(s)$ are generating functions with multiplicative structure arising from either arithmetic-geometric objects (like number fields or elliptic curves) or representation-theoretic objects (automorphic forms). Many equidistribution problems in number theory rely on one's ability to accurately bound the size of L-functions; optimal bounds arise from the (unproven!) Riemann Hypothesis for $\zeta(s)$ and its extensions to other L-functions. I will discuss some motivating problems along with recent work (joint with Kannan Soundararajan) which produces new bounds for L-functions by proving a suitable "statistical approximation" to the (extended) Riemann Hypothesis.

5:00 pm in 241 Altgeld Hall,Monday, January 27, 2020

To Be Announced

Abstract: We are going to read the new paper disproving Connes' embedding's conjecture. We start with an organization today.

Tuesday, January 28, 2020

1:00 pm in 241 Altgeld Hall,Tuesday, January 28, 2020

Organizational Meeting and Introduction

Dakota Ihli/Alexi Block Gorman (UIUC)

Abstract: We will decide on the permanent time and location for the seminar in this meeting. We will also discuss what we plan to cover for the next few weeks, and who will lead the seminar for those dates. We will state a few of the basic definitions for computability theory and discuss them briefly. All levels of experience with logic/computability are welcome!

2:00 pm in 243 Altgeld Hall,Tuesday, January 28, 2020

Ramsey upper density of infinite graphs

Ander Lamaison (Freie U. Berlin)

Abstract: Let $H$ be an infinite graph. In a two-coloring of the edges of the complete graph on the natural numbers, what is the densest monochromatic subgraph isomorphic to $H$ that we are guaranteed to find? We measure the density of a subgraph by the upper density of its vertex set. This question, in the particular case of the infinite path, was introduced by Erdős and Galvin. Following a recent result for the infinite path, we present bounds on the maximum density for other choices of $H$, including exact values for a wide class of bipartite graphs.

3:00 pm in 245 Altgeld Hall,Tuesday, January 28, 2020

Insuring longevity risk and long-term care: Bequest, housing and liquidity

Mengyi Xu (University of New South Wales)

Abstract: The demand for life annuities and long-term care insurance (LTCI) varies among retirees with different preferences and financial profiles. This paper shows that bequest motives can enhance the demand for LTCI unless the opportunity cost of self-insurance through precautionary savings is low. This typically occurs when retirees have sufficient liquid wealth. If retirees tend to liquidate housing assets in the event of becoming disabled that requires sizeable costs, housing wealth is likely to enhance the demand for annuities and to crowd out the demand for LTCI. Cash-poor-asset-rich retirees show little interest in annuities, but they may purchase LTCI to preserve their bequests.

Wednesday, January 29, 2020

3:30 pm in 341 Altgeld Hall,Wednesday, January 29, 2020

Introduction to IRS

Jenna Zomback and Anush Tserunyan

Abstract: This is an introductory talk on Invariant Random Subgroups (IRS), which can be viewed as probabilistic generalization of normal subgroups and lattices. We will show that for all countable groups, all IRS arise from pmp actions, and discuss Kesten's theorem for IRS. All this is from the paper "Kesten's theorem for Invariant Random Subgroups" by Abert, Glasner, and Virag [arXiv].

Thursday, January 30, 2020

11:00 am in 241 Altgeld Hall,Thursday, January 30, 2020

Modularity of some $\mathrm{PGL}_2(\mathbb{F}_5)$ representations

Patrick Allen (Illinois)

Abstract: Serre's conjecture, proved by Khare and Wintenberger, states that every odd two dimensional mod p representation of the absolute Galois group of the rationals comes from a modular form. This admits a natural generalization to totally real fields, but even the real quadratic case seems completely out of reach. I'll discuss some of the difficulties one encounters and then discuss some new cases that can be proved when p = 5. This is joint work with Chandrashekhar Khare and Jack Thorne.

2:00 pm in 347 Altgeld Hall,Thursday, January 30, 2020

The Semicircle Law for Wigner Matrices

Kesav Krishnan (UIUC Math)

Abstract: I will introduce Wigner Matrices and their universal properties. I will then state the semi-circle law and sketch out three district proofs, in analogy to the proof of the usual central limit theorem. Talk 1 will sketch out the proof via the Stieltjes transform and via the energy entropy balance.

4:00 pm in 245 Altgeld Hall,Thursday, January 30, 2020

Local and global boundary rigidity

Plamen Stefanov   [email] (Purdue University)

Abstract: Abstract: The boundary rigidity problem consist of recovering a Riemannian metric in a domain, up to an isometry, from the distance between boundary points. We show that in dimensions three and higher, knowing the distance near a fixed strictly convex boundary point allows us to reconstruct the metric inside the domain near that point, and that this reconstruction is stable. We also prove semi-global and global results under certain an assumption of the existence of a strictly convex foliation. The problem can be reformulated as a recovery of the metric from the arrival times of waves between boundary points; which is known as travel-time tomography. The interest in this problem is motivated by imaging problems in seismology: to recover the sub-surface structure of the Earth given travel-times from the propagation of seismic waves. In oil exploration, the seismic signals are man-made and the problem is local in nature. In particular, we can recover locally the compressional and the shear wave speeds for the elastic Earth model, given local information. The talk is based on a joint work with G.Uhlmann (UW) and A.Vasy (Stanford). We will also present results for a recovery of a Lorentzian metric from red shifts motivated by the problem of observing cosmic strings. The methods are based on Melrose’s scattering calculus in particular but we will try to make the exposition accessible to a wider audience without going deep into the technicalities.

Friday, January 31, 2020

3:00 pm in 347 Altgeld Hall,Friday, January 31, 2020

Indroduction to Non Commutative Probability

Kesav Krishnan (UIUC Math)

Abstract: In this talk I will introduce Non Commutative Probability Theory, and highlight some of its uses in classical Probability, such as the study of random matrices. In particular, motivation of Wigner's semi-circle law as the non commutative analog of the Central Limit Theorem.

4:00 pm in 341 Altgeld Hall,Friday, January 31, 2020

What Is A Mathematics?

Robert Joseph Rennie   [email] (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)

Abstract: In this talk, I will begin with a mathematization of the process of mathematization. We will then see how category theory and type theory provide a nice general framework for constructing and comparing systems of math. This discussion will motivate, without ever mentioning topological spaces, the study of higher toposes to anyone who cares about theoretical physics (not necessarily just those who study it). This talk requires only an interest in thinking about how math works.

4:00 pm in 141 Altgeld Hall,Friday, January 31, 2020

Introduction to Orbifolds

Brannon Basilio (UIUC)

Abstract: We can generalize the notion of a manifold to include singularities; thus we can define a new object called orbifolds. In this talk, we will give an introduction to the notion of orbifolds, including examples, covering orbifold, Euler number of an orbifold, and the classification theorem of 2-orbifolds.

Monday, February 3, 2020

3:00 pm in 441 Altgeld Hall,Monday, February 3, 2020

Exotic elements in Picard groups

Ningchuan Zhang (Illinois Math)

Abstract: In this talk, I will discuss the subgroup of exotic elements in the $K(h)$-local Picard groups. We will first show this subgroup is zero when $p\gg h$ and then focus on the $(h,p)=(1,2)$ and $(2,3)$ cases.

5:00 pm in 241 Altgeld Hall,Monday, February 3, 2020

Connes' Embedding problem

Marius Junge

Abstract: We start

Tuesday, February 4, 2020

12:00 pm in 243 Altgeld Hall,Tuesday, February 4, 2020

Sofic groups, sofic entropy and surjunctivity of dynamical systems

Tullio Ceccherini-Silberstein (Università degli Studi del Sannio)

Abstract: A dynamical system is a pair $(X, G)$ where $X$ is a compact metrizable space and $G$ is a countable group acting on $X$ by homeomorphisms. An endomorphism of $(X, G)$ is a continuous map from $X$ to $X$ which commutes with the action of $G$. A dynamical system is surjunctive if every injective endomorphism is surjunctive, and therefore a homeomorphism. Sofic groups were introduced by Gromov and Weiss as a generalization of both residually finite groups and amenable groups. A celebrated theorem of Gromov (and Weiss) is that if $A$ is a finite set and $G$ is sofic, then $(AG, G)$ is surjunctive. In recent work with Michel Coornaert and Hanfeng Li we generalize the Gromov-Weiss theorem to show that every dynamical system $(X, G)$ with certain suitable properties is surjunctive.

1:00 pm in Altgeld Hall,Tuesday, February 4, 2020

To Be Announced

1:00 pm in 241 Altgeld Hall,Tuesday, February 4, 2020

Model-theoretic techniques in query learning

Hunter Chase (UIC)

Abstract: Several notions of complexity of set systems correspond both with model-theoretic dividing lines and notions of machine learning. We describe a new connection between query learning and stable formulas without the finite cover property.

1:00 pm in 347 Altgeld Hall,Tuesday, February 4, 2020

Local smoothing estimates for Fourier Integral Operators

David Beltran (U. Wisconsin, Madison)

Abstract: The sharp fixed-time Sobolev estimates for Fourier Integral Operators (and therefore solutions to wave equations in Euclidean space or compact manifolds) were established by Seeger, Sogge and Stein in the early 90s. Shortly after, Sogge observed that a local average in time leads to a regularity improvement with respect to the sharp fixed-time estimates. Establishing variable-coefficient counterparts of the Bourgain—Demeter decoupling inequalities, we improve the previous best known local smoothing estimates for FIOs. Moreover, we show that our results are sharp in both the Lebesgue and regularity exponent (up to the endpoint) in odd dimensions. This is joint work with Jonathan Hickman and Christopher D. Sogge.

2:00 pm in 243 Altgeld Hall,Tuesday, February 4, 2020

The Game of Plates and Olives

Sean English (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign)

Abstract: Much can be learned about a manifold by studying the smooth functions on it. One particularly nice type of functions are Morse Functions. The game of plates and olives was formulated by Nicolaescu to study an enumeration problem related to Morse functions on the 2-sphere.

In the game of plates and olives, there are four different types of moves:
1.) add a new plate to the table,
2.) combine two plates and their olives onto one plate, removing the second plate from the table,
3.) add an olive to a plate, and
4.) remove an olive from a plate.

We will look at the original problem of enumerating Morse functions on the sphere, and also will look at the game of plates and olives when it is played by choosing a move to make at each step randomly. We will see that with high probability the number of olives grows linearly as the total number of moves goes to infinity.

This project was joint work with Andrzej Dudek and Alan Frieze.

3:00 pm in 243 Altgeld Hall,Tuesday, February 4, 2020

Moduli spaces of Lagrangians in symplectic topology and mirror symmetry

James Pascaleff (UIUC)

Abstract: Moduli spaces of Lagrangians (as objects in Fukaya categories), and the geometry on such moduli spaces, may be used to understand problems in symplectic topology and mirror symmetry. In this talk, I will introduce these ideas and give an example showing how to use symplectic topology to solve a problem about Laurent polynomials (based on joint work with Dmitry Tonkonog).

Wednesday, February 5, 2020

3:30 pm in 341 Altgeld Hall,Wednesday, February 5, 2020

Cancelled

4:00 pm in 245 Altgeld Hall,Wednesday, February 5, 2020

Displays of Polish Isometry Groups in Banach Lattices

Mary Angelica Gramcko-Tursi

Abstract: A Polish group $G$ is displayable in a Banach lattice $(X, \|\cdot \|)$ if there exists a group homomorphism $\rho$ from $G$ into the lattice isometries of $X$ such that 1) $G$ is homeomorphic to $\rho(G)$, and 2) $X$ can be renormed with an equivalent lattice norm $\|| \cdot |\|$ so that $\rho(G)$ is the group of lattice isometries on $(X, \| | \cdot | \| )$. When is a group $G$ displayable in a Banach lattice $X$? This question has been explored in the context of Banach spaces and surjective linear isometries. In this talk based on ongoing work, we first survey some the known results and techniques for displays in Banach spaces to provide context. We then prove displayability results for certain classes of Banach lattices. In particular, if $X$ is either order continuous or an $AM$ space, $X$ can be renormed using various techniques, so that the identity is the only lattice isometry on $X$. Finally, we expand on these techniques to give general conditions sufficient for $G$ to be a display on $X$. This talk will be accessible to grad students of all levels.

Thursday, February 6, 2020

11:00 am in 241 Altgeld Hall,Thursday, February 6, 2020

The Kuznetsov formulas for GL(3)

Jack Buttcane (University of Maine)

Abstract: The Kuznetsov formulas for GL(2) connect the study of automorphic forms to the study of exponential sums. They are useful in a wide variety of seemingly unrelated problems in analytic number theory, and I will (briefly) illustrate this with a pair of examples: First, if we consider the roots v of a quadratic polynomial modulo a prime p, then the sequence of fractions v/p is uniformly distributed modulo 1; this is the “mod p equidistribution” theorem of Duke, Friedlander, Iwaniec and Toth. Second, the Random Wave Conjecture states that a sequence of automorphic forms should exhibit features of a random wave as their Laplacian eigenvalues tend to infinity. I will discuss their generalization to GL(3) and applications.

2:00 pm in 347 Altgeld Hall,Thursday, February 6, 2020

The Semicircle Law for Wigner Matrices Part 2

Kesav Krishnan (UIUC Math)

Abstract: I will introduce Wigner Matrices and their universal properties. I will then state the semi-circle law and sketch out three district proofs, in analogy to the proof of the usual central limit theorem. talk two will discuss the proof based on the method of moments and its relation to enumerative combinatorics.

4:00 pm in 245 Altgeld Hall,Thursday, February 6, 2020

Analytic Grothendieck Riemann Roch Theorem

Xiang Tang   [email] (Washington University St. Louis)

Abstract: Abstract: In this talk, we will introduce an interesting index problem naturally associated to the Arveson-Douglas conjecture in functional analysis. This index problem is a generalization of the classical Toeplitz index theorem, and connects to many different branches of Mathematics. In particular, it can be viewed as an analytic version of the Grothendieck Riemann Roch theorem. This is joint work with R. Douglas,M. Jabbari, and G. Yu.

Friday, February 7, 2020

3:00 pm in 347 Altgeld Hall,Friday, February 7, 2020

Indroduction to Non Commutative Probability Part 2

Kesav Krishnan (UIUC Math)

Abstract: I will continue the talk from last friday, on the Introduction to Non Commutative Probability. In this talk, I will focus on limit laws, in particular the non commutative CLT and the universality of the semi-circle law.

4:00 pm in Altgeld Hall,Friday, February 7, 2020

A Brief Introduction to Problem Writing

David Altizio   [email] (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)

Abstract: Many of the best mathematics competition problems push the boundaries of pre-calculus math in unexpected ways. While these questions fuel the popularity of contests among middle and high school students, they also make competitions seem inherently unsustainable; constructing these questions appears to be a Herculean task. In this talk, I will shed some insight into how problems are made by exploring my eight-year-long journey through problem writing. In particular, I will discuss common writing philosophies, sources of inspiration, and the stories behind some of my favorite creations.

4:00 pm in 141 Altgeld Hall,Friday, February 7, 2020

A probabilistic approach to quantizing Yang-Mills theory

Kesav Krishnan (UIUC)

Abstract: I will introduce the problem of rigorously quantizing Yang Mills Theory, and how probability theory can be used to that end. If time permits, I will talk about the discrete gauge-string duality as introduced by Sourav Chatterjee

Saturday, February 8, 2020

8:30 am in 239 Altgeld Hall,Saturday, February 8, 2020

To Be Announced

Monday, February 10, 2020

3:00 pm in 441 Altgeld Hall,Monday, February 10, 2020

Exotic elements in Picard groups (part 2)

Ningchuan Zhang (Illinois Math)

Abstract: In this talk, I will discuss the subgroup of exotic elements in the $K(h)$-local Picard groups. We will first show this subgroup is zero when $p\gg h$ and then focus on the $(h,p)=(1,2)$ and $(2,3)$ cases.

3:00 pm in 243 Altgeld Hall,Monday, February 10, 2020

The moduli space of objects in the Fukaya category

James Pascaleff (Illinois)

Abstract: In this talk I will survey some tools from derived algebraic geometry that, when applied to Fukaya categories have applications to symplectic topology and mirror symmetry. (Note: this talk is connected with the talk I gave last week in the algebraic geometry seminar, but will be self-contained and largely disjoint.)

5:00 pm in 241 Altgeld Hall,Monday, February 10, 2020

Connes' Embedding Problem

(TBA)

Abstract: CEB2

Tuesday, February 11, 2020

11:00 am in 243 Altgeld Hall,Tuesday, February 11, 2020

Vanishing and Realizability

Shane Clark (University of Kentucky)

Abstract: The Reidemeister trace of an endomorphism of a CW complex is a lower bound for the number of fixed points (up to homotopy) of that endomorphism. For an endomorphism $f$, the Reidemeister trace of $f^n$ is a lower bound for the number of fixed points of $f^n$, however it can be a far from an optimal lower bound. One method of addressing this discrepancy constructs an equivariant map, the n^{th} Fuller trace $f$, which carries information about the periodic points of a map $f$. However, we must ask how much information is retained by this equivariant construction? In this talk we show that the n^{th} Fuller trace of $f$ is a complete invariant for describing a minimum set of periodic points for maps of tori.

1:00 pm in 241 Altgeld Hall,Tuesday, February 11, 2020

The Borel complexity of quotient groups

Joshua Frisch (Caltech Math)

Abstract: The theory of Borel equivalence relations gives us rigorous methods to says when one classification problem/equivalence relation is more "complicated" than another. Given a countable group it's outer-automorphism group naturally has the structure of a borel equivalence relation. Motivated by this example, in this talk I will give a brief introduction to the theory of countable borel equivalence relations, describe some previously known connections with the theory of groups and, finally, describe a new new result explaining exactly how complicated the Borel complexity of quotient groups (which generalize outer-automorphism groups) can be. This is joint work with Forte Shinko.

2:00 pm in 243 Altgeld Hall,Tuesday, February 11, 2020

Large triangle packings and Tuza's conjecture in random graphs

Patrick Bennett (Western Michigan University)

Abstract: The triangle packing number $\nu(G)$ of a graph $G$ is the maximum size of a set of edge-disjoint triangles in $G$. Tuza conjectured that in any graph $G$ there exists a set of at most $2\nu(G)$ edges intersecting every triangle in $G$. We show that Tuza's conjecture holds in the random graph $G=G(n,m)$, when $m \le 0.2403n^{3/2}$ or $m\ge 2.1243n^{3/2}$. This is done by analyzing a greedy algorithm for finding large triangle packings in random graphs.

Wednesday, February 12, 2020

3:30 pm in 341 Altgeld Hall,Wednesday, February 12, 2020

Strongly amenable groups

Joshua Frisch (Caltech Math)

Abstract: A topological dynamical system (i.e. a group acting by homeomorphisms on a compact Hausdorff space) is said to be proximal if for any two points $p$ and $q$ we can simultaneously "push them together" (rigorously, there is a net $g_n$ such that $\lim g_n(p) = \lim g_n(q)$). In his paper introducing the concept of proximality, Glasner noted that whenever $\mathbb{Z}$ acts proximally, that action will have a fixed point. He termed groups with this fixed point property "strongly amenable" and showed that non-amenable groups are not strongly amenable and virtually nilpotent groups are strongly amenable. In this talk I will discuss recent work precisely characterizing which (countable) groups are strongly amenable. This is joint work with Omer Tamuz and Pooya Vahidi Ferdowsi.

Thursday, February 13, 2020

11:00 am in 241 Altgeld Hall,Thursday, February 13, 2020

Divisors of integers, permutations and polynomials

Kevin Ford (Illinois Math)

Abstract: We describe a probabilistic model that describes the statistical behavior of the divisors of integers, divisors of permutations and divisors of polynomials over a finite field. We will discuss how this can be used to obtain new bounds on the concentration of divisors of integers, improving a result of Maier and Tenenbaum. This is joint work with Ben Green and Dimitris Koukoulopoulos.

12:00 pm in 243 Altgeld Hall,Thursday, February 13, 2020

Choquet-Deny groups and the Infinite conjugacy class property

Josh Frisch (Caltech)

Abstract: The Poisson Boundary of a random walk on a group is a measure space that corresponds to the space of different asymptotic trajectories that the random walk might take. Given a group $G$ and a probability measure $\mu$ on $G$ the Poisson boundary is trivial (i.e. has no non-trivial events) if and only if $G$ supports a bounded $mu$-harmonic function. In this talk I will give an introduction to the notion of the poisson boundary and discuss a recent characterization of exactly which countable groups $G$ have a trivial Poisson Boundary for every measure $\mu$ (the so called Choquet-Deny groups). This characterization will immediately imply that, for finitely generated groups, these groups are exactly those of polynomial growth. This answers a question of Kaimanovich and Vershik. Surprisingly, the proof does not rely at all on growth estimates for a group, and instead relies on the algebraic infinite conjugacy class property. This is joint work with Yair Hartman, Omer Tamuz, and Pooya Vahidi Ferdowski.

2:00 pm in 243 Altgeld Hall,Thursday, February 13, 2020

Asymptotic dimension and coarse embeddings in the quantum setting

Alejandro Chavez-Dominguez (University of Oklahoma)

Abstract: We generalize the notions of asymptotic dimension and coarse embeddings, from metric spaces to quantum metric spaces in the sense of Kuperberg and Weaver. We show that the quantum asymptotic dimension behaves well with respect to several natural operations, and in particular with respect to quantum coarse embeddings. Moreover, in analogy with the classical case, we prove that a quantum metric space that equi-coarsely contains a sequence of quantum expanders must have infinite asymptotic dimension. This is done by proving a vertex-isoperimetric inequality for quantum expanders, based upon a previously known edge-isoperimetric one. Joint work with Andrew Swift.

2:00 pm in 347 Altgeld Hall,Thursday, February 13, 2020

Distribution of eigenvalues of random matrices (part I)

Peixue Wu (UIUC Math)

Abstract: Last time we proved a famous semicircular law for the limit distribution of the empirical measure of the eigenvalues of Wigner's matrix (i.i.d. under the symmetry restriction). When we go over the proof in detail, we find two essential ingredients to the proof: 1. Stochastic independence of the entries. 2. Most matrix entries are centered and have the same variance. Using the similar idea (methods of moments) we will show that semicircular law holds for a much larger class of random matrices. We will also talk about the joint distribution for the eigenvalues of the Gaussian Orthogonal (Unitary) Ensembles (GOE or GUE).

Friday, February 14, 2020

3:00 pm in 347 Altgeld Hall,Friday, February 14, 2020

An Introduction to $L^2$ Cohomology

Gayana Jayasinghe (UIUC Math)

Abstract: We'll see how we can construct quasi isometry invariants and some conformal invariants with function spaces and operators on manifolds (and some more general spaces), and how we can use analysis to study geometric structures

4:00 pm in 341 Altgeld Hall,Friday, February 14, 2020

Prime Number Conjectures

Raghavendra Bhat (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)

Abstract: Freshman math major and author (Math -- A Subtle Language of the Universe) Raghavendra Bhat will present some of his prime number conjectures, which he has presented on many platforms across the world. His talk will focus on his recent conjectures and thoughts on number theory research and math in general.

4:00 pm in 141 Altgeld Hall,Friday, February 14, 2020

Bounds on volumes of mapping tori

Heejoung Kim (UIUC)

Abstract: For a surface $S$ and a homeomorphism $f: S\to S$, the mapping torus of $S$ by $f$ is defined by $M_f=(S\times [0,1])/((x,0)\sim (f(x), 1))$. In particular, for a closed surface $S$ of genus at least 2 and a pseudo-Anosov element $f$ of the mapping class group of $S$, $M_f$ is a hyperbolic manifold. Brock provided bounds of the hyperbolic volume of $M_f$ from a hyperbolic structure on $M_f$ by using its Weil-Petersson metric. And then Agol gave a sharp upper bound for the volume in terms of the translation distance on the pants graph $P(S)$ which is associated with pants decomposition on $S$. In this talk, we will discuss mapping class groups and Agol's proof on the upper bound.

Monday, February 17, 2020

2:00 pm in 241 Altgeld Hall,Monday, February 17, 2020

From Polaris Variable Annuities to Regression-based Monte Carlo

Zhiyi (Joey) Shen (University of Waterloo)

Abstract: In this talk, I will first discuss the no-arbitrage pricing of Polaris variable annuities (VAs), which were issued by the American International Group in recent years. Variable annuities are prevailing equity-linked insurance products that provide the policyholder with the flexibility of dynamic withdrawals, mortality protection, and guaranteed income payments against a market decline. The Polaris allows a shadow account to lock in the high watermark of the investment account over a monitoring period that depends on the policyholder’s choice of his/her first withdrawal time. This feature makes the insurer’s payouts depend on policyholder’s withdrawal behaviours and significantly complicates the pricing problem. By prudently introducing certain auxiliary state variables, we manage to formulate the pricing problem into solving a convoluted stochastic optimal control framework and developing a computationally efficient algorithm to approach the solution. Driven by the challenges from the pricing Polaris VAs, in the second part of the talk, I will introduce a regression-based Monte Carlo algorithm, which we propose to solve a class of general stochastic optimal control problems numerically. The algorithm has three pillars: a construction of auxiliary stochastic control model, an artificial simulation of the post-action value of state process, and a shape-preserving sieve estimation method. The algorithm enjoys many merits, including obviating forward simulation and control randomization, eliminating in-sample bias, evading extrapolating the value function, and alleviating the computational burden of the tuning parameter selection. This talk is based on two joint works with Chengguo Weng from the University of Waterloo.

3:00 pm in 441 Altgeld Hall,Monday, February 17, 2020

A geometric perspective on the foundations of modern homotopy theory

Brian Shin (Illinois Math)

Abstract: Homotopy theorists have always been interested in studying spaces. However, the meaning of the word ``space'' has evolved over the years. Whereas one used to say space to mean a topological space, it seems the modern stance is to view a space as an $\infty$-groupoid. In this expository talk, I would like to connect the modern stance back to geometry. In particular, I will demonstrate how the $\infty$-category of spaces can be built out of the category of manifolds. As an application, we will use this connection to give a geometric perspective on infinite loop space theory.

3:00 pm in 243 Altgeld Hall,Monday, February 17, 2020

Prequantization, Differential Cohomology and the Genus Integration

Rui Loja Fernandes (Illinois)

Abstract: In recent joint work with Ivan Contreras, we have introduced the genus integration of a Lie algebroid. In this talk, I will explain the relationship between the genus integration of a canonical Lie algebroid associated with a closed 2-form and the classical prequantization condition. As a by product, one recovers the usual classification of principal $S^1$-bundles with connection in terms of differential cohomology. Time permitting, I will also discuss the first steps in extending these results to higher algebroids and higher degree differential cohomology.

5:00 pm in Altgeld Hall,Monday, February 17, 2020

Connes' Embedding Problem

TBA (UIUC)

Abstract: CEB3

Tuesday, February 18, 2020

2:00 pm in 243 Altgeld Hall,Tuesday, February 18, 2020

Progress towards Nash-Williams' Conjecture on Triangle Decompositions

Michelle Delcourt (Ryerson University)

Abstract: Partitioning the edges of a graph into edge disjoint triangles forms a triangle decomposition of the graph. A famous conjecture by Nash-Williams from 1970 asserts that any sufficiently large, triangle divisible graph on $n$ vertices with minimum degree at least $0.75n$ admits a triangle decomposition. In the light of recent results, the fractional version of this problem is of central importance. A fractional triangle decomposition is an assignment of non-negative weights to each triangle in a graph such that the sum of the weights along each edge is precisely one.

We show that for any graph on $n$ vertices with minimum degree at least $0.827327n$ admits a fractional triangle decomposition. Combined with results of Barber, Kühn, Lo, and Osthus, this implies that for every sufficiently large triangle divisible graph on n vertices with minimum degree at least $0.82733n$ admits a triangle decomposition. This is a significant improvement over the previous asymptotic result of Dross showing the existence of fractional triangle decompositions of sufficiently large graphs with minimum degree more than $0.9n$. This is joint work with Luke Postle.

3:00 pm in 245 Altgeld Hall,Tuesday, February 18, 2020

Mixture of Experts Regression Models for Insurance Ratemaking and Reserving

Tsz Chai "Samson" Fung (University of Toronto)

Abstract: Understanding the effect of policyholders' risk profile on the number and the amount of claims, as well as the dependence among different types of claims, are critical to insurance ratemaking and IBNR-type reserving. To accurately quantify such features, it is essential to develop a regression model which is flexible, interpretable and statistically tractable. In this presentation, I will discuss a highly flexible nonlinear regression model we have recently developed, namely the logit-weighted reduced mixture of experts (LRMoE) models, for multivariate claim frequencies or severities distributions. The LRMoE model is interpretable as it has two components: Gating functions to classify policyholders into various latent sub-classes and Expert functions to govern the distributional properties of the claims. The model is also flexible to fit any types of claim data accurately and hence minimize the issue of model selection. Model implementation is illustrated in two ways using a real automobile insurance dataset from a major European insurance company. We first fit the multivariate claim frequencies using an Erlang count expert function. Apart from showing excellent fitting results, we can interpret the fitted model in an insurance perspective and visualize the relationship between policyholders' information and their risk level. We further demonstrate how the fitted model may be useful for insurance ratemaking. The second illustration deals with insurance loss severity data that often exhibits heavy-tail behavior. Using a Transformed Gamma expert function, our model is applicable to fit the severity and reporting delay components of the dataset, which is ultimately shown to be useful and crucial for an adequate prediction of IBNR reserve. This project is joint work with Andrei Badescu and Sheldon Lin.

4:00 pm in 341 Altgeld Hall,Tuesday, February 18, 2020

Julia Robinson and Hilbert's Tenth Problem (film)

Abstract: Julia Robinson was the first woman elected to the mathematical section of the National Academy of Sciences, and the first woman to become president of the American Mathematical Society. While tracing Robinson's contribution to the solution of Hilbert's tenth problem, the film illuminates how her work led to an unusual friendship between Russian and American colleagues at the height of the Cold War.

4:00 pm in 314 Altgeld Hall,Tuesday, February 18, 2020

In Transition - Mathematics and Art

Kirsi Peltonen   [email] (Aalto University, Finland)

Abstract: This is a talk for the general public and academic audience interested in possibilities for enhancing interaction between contemporary mathematics and arts. What are the needs for this dialogue in different levels of education, research and broader in the society? Recent multidisciplinary activities challenging the traditions and communication of mathematics and arts at Aalto University in Finland have given a new type of platform to share the beauty of mathematics systematically and open accessible layers to a useful interplay. Many outcomes and byproducts of our up-to-date experiments are perfect for applications in digital technologies such as programming, CAD, 3D printing, virtual and augmented reality. Some scenarios for the future development are presented.

Wednesday, February 19, 2020

4:00 pm in 245 Altgeld Hall,Wednesday, February 19, 2020

Real Talk : Connecting communities through intercultural communication

Brewster, Teryl P (Office of Inclusion&Intercultural Relations)

Abstract: Join the Social Justice Educators Paraprofessional Program & AWM for a conversation about cultural identity and how it influences communication.

Thursday, February 20, 2020

11:00 am in 241 Altgeld Hall,Thursday, February 20, 2020

The Third Moment of Quadratic L-Functions

Ian Whitehead (Swarthmore College)

Abstract: I will present.a smoothed asymptotic formula for the third moment of Dirichlet L-functions associated to real characters. Beyond the main term, which was known, the formula has an unexpected secondary term of size $X^{3/4}$ and an error of size $X^{2/3}$. I will give background on the multiple Dirichlet series techniques that motivated this result. And I will describe the new ideas about local and global multiple Dirichlet series that made the final, sieving step in the proof possible. This is joint work with Adrian Diaconu.

2:00 pm in 347 Altgeld Hall,Thursday, February 20, 2020

Distribution of eigenvalues of random matrices (part II)

Peixue Wu (UIUC Math)

Abstract: Last time we proved the classical Wigner's semicircular law for Wigner matrix. This time I will state a dynamical version of the semicircular law, which implies the classical Wigner's semicircular law. Our main tool will be stochastic analysis.

2:00 pm in 243 Altgeld Hall,Thursday, February 20, 2020

Around the Folds

Kirsi Peltonen (Aalto University, Finland)

Abstract: We will discuss about various ways to use origami and folding as a multidisciplinary tool in research and education. Some ongoing projects funded by Academy of Finland and Ministry of Education and Culture with theoretical and practical goals are described. The slides of the talk as a pdf-file can be obtained by clicking on the name of the speaker above.

4:00 pm in 245 Altgeld Hall,Thursday, February 20, 2020

Data-driven methods for model identification and parameter estimation of dynamical systems

Niall Mangan   [email] (Northwestern University)

Abstract: Inferring the structure and dynamical interactions of complex systems is critical to understanding and controlling their behavior. I am interested in discovering models from the time-series in order to understand biological systems, material behavior, and other dynamical systems. One can frame the problem as selecting which interactions, or model terms, are most likely responsible for the observed dynamics from a library of possible terms. Several challenges make model selection and parameter estimation difficult including nonlinearities, varying parameters or equations, and unmeasured state variables. I will discuss methods for reframing these problems so that sparse model selection is possible including implicit formulation and data clustering. I will also discuss preliminary results for parameter estimation and model selection for deterministic and chaotic systems with hidden or unmeasured variables. We use a variational annealing strategy that allows us to estimate both the unknown parameters and the unmeasured state variables.

4:00 pm in 243 Altgeld Hall,Thursday, February 20, 2020

Variable-order time-fractional partial differential equations: modeling and analysis

Hong Wang (University of South Carolina)

Abstract: Fractional partial differential equations (FPDEs) provide more accurate descriptions of anomalously diffusive transport of solute in heterogeneous porous media than integer-order PDEs do, because they generate solutions with power law (instead of exponentially) decaying tails that were observed in field tests. However, solutions to time-fractional PDEs (tFPDEs) have nonphysical singularity at the initial time t=0, which does not seem physically relevant to anomalously diffusive transport they model and makes many error estimates to their numerical approximations in the literature that were proved under the full regularity assumption of the true solutions in appropriate. The reason lies in the incompatibility between the nonlocality of the power law decaying tail of the solutions and the locality of the initial condition. But there is no consensus on how to correct the nonphysical behavior of tFPDEs. We argue that the order of a physically correct tFPDE model should vary smoothly near the initial time to account for the impact of the locality of the initial condition. Moreover, variable-order tFPDEs themselves also occur in a variety of applications. However, rigorous analysis on variable-order tFPDEs is meager. We outline the proof of the wellposedness and smoothing properties of tFPDEs. More precisely, we prove that their solutions have the similar regularities to their integer-order analogues if the order has an integer limit at the initial time or have the same singularity near the initial time as their constant-order analogues otherwise.

Friday, February 21, 2020

2:00 pm in 447 Altgeld Hall,Friday, February 21, 2020

Novikov conjecture for groups generated by coarsely embeddable groups under extensions and admissible limits

Zhizhang Xie (Texas A&M)

Abstract: I will talk about some recent work on the strong Novikov conjecture for groups generated by coarsely embeddable groups under extensions and admissible limits. Here we say a group $G$ is an admissible limit of a family of groups $\{ G_i \}$ if the following is satisfied: for any finite subset $F$ of $G$, there exists $n$ such that the preimage of $F$ in $G_i$ injects into $G$ for all $i > n$. This talk is based on my joint work with Jintao Deng and Guoliang Yu.

4:00 pm in 341 Altgeld Hall,Friday, February 21, 2020

Julia Robinson and Hilbert's Tenth Problem

(UIUC Math)

Abstract: Julia Robinson was the first woman elected to the mathematical section of the National Academy of Sciences, and the first woman to become president of the American Mathematical Society. While tracing Robinson's contribution to the solution of Hilbert's tenth problem, the film illuminates how her work led to an unusual friendship between Russian and American colleagues at the height of the Cold War.

4:00 pm in 141 Altgeld Hall,Friday, February 21, 2020

Unifying Galois Theories with Categorification

Robert (Joseph) Rennie (UIUC)

Abstract: Since its inception nearly two centuries ago, what we call "Galois Theory" (say in an undergraduate algebra course) has led to many analogous results, and thus attained the status of a sort of metatheorem. In Galois' case, this concept was applied to fields, yielding an equivalence between some lattice of field extensions and a lattice of subgroups of a corresponding "galois group" ... under certain conditions. Later on, the same concept was shown to be present in Topology, with extensions being replaced by their dual notion of covering spaces, and the galois group being replaced by the fundamental group... again, under certain conditions. Even later, Galois' results for fields were generalized to arbitrary rings, introducing new associated data along the way. In this talk, we explore the process of formally unifying all of these "Galois Theories" into one Galois Principle, with the aim of developing an intuition for identifying some of its infinite use-cases in the wilds of Math (e.g. Algebra, Topology, and Logic). Along the way, I aim to discuss explicitly and to motivate categorification to the working mathematician using the results of this talk as concrete examples.

5:00 pm in 245 Altgeld Hall,Friday, February 21, 2020

Workshop on how to write a report

Alfred Chong and Daniel Linders (U of I)

Monday, February 24, 2020

11:00 am in 464 Loomis ,Monday, February 24, 2020

Developments in the Bagger-Witten and Hodge line bundles

Eric Sharpe (Virginia Tech Physics)

Abstract: This talk will concern advances in understanding explicitly the Bagger-Witten line bundle appearing in four-dimensional N=1 supergravity, which is closely related to the Hodge line bundle on a moduli space of Calabi-Yaus. This has recently been a subject of interest, but explicit examples have proven elusive in the past. In this talk we will outline some recent advances, including (1) a description of the Bagger-Witten line bundle on a moduli space of Calabi-Yau's as a line bundle of covariantly constant spinors (resulting in a square root of the Hodge line bundle of holomorphic top-forms), (2) results suggesting that it (and the Hodge line bundle) is always flat, but possibly never trivial, over moduli spaces of Calabi-Yaus of maximal holonomy and dimension greater than two. We will propose its nontriviality as a new criterion for existence of UV completions of four-dimensional supergravity theories. If time permits, we will explicitly construct an example, to concretely display these properties, and outline results obtained with Ron Donagi and Mark Macerato for other cases.

3:00 pm in 243 Altgeld Hall,Monday, February 24, 2020

On symplectic capacities and their blindspots

Ely Kerman (Illinois)

Abstract: Symplectic capacities are real-valued symplectic invariants which play an important role in embedding problems. Many fundamental questions concerning their properties remain unresolved in large part because they are difficult to compute. In this talk I will describe some new computations of the capacities defined for star-shaped domains by Gutt and Hutchings. The relevant class of examples is rich enough to yield several new insights into what these capacities can and cannot see. This is a report on joint work with Yuanpu Liang.

3:00 pm in 441 Altgeld Hall,Monday, February 24, 2020

An introduction to motivic homotopy theory

Brian Shin (Illinois Math)

Abstract: Motivic homotopy is often thought of as the homotopy theory of algebraic varieties. In this expository talk, we'll see exactly what that means. In particular, we'll see how the construction of the category of motivic spaces is a direct algebro-geometric analog of that of the category of spaces. More interestingly, we'll also see how the analogy breaks down.

4:00 pm in 314 Altgeld Hall,Monday, February 24, 2020

Digits

Frank Calegari (University of Chicago)

Abstract: We discuss some results concerning the decimal expansion of 1/p for primes p, some due to Gauss, and some from the present day. This talk will be accessible to undergraduates.

5:00 pm in 241 Altgeld Hall,Monday, February 24, 2020

Connes' Embedding Problem

TBA (UIUC)

Abstract: CEB4

Tuesday, February 25, 2020

11:00 am in 243 Altgeld Hall,Tuesday, February 25, 2020

\'Etale K-theory

Akhil Mathew (U Chicago)

Abstract: I will explain some general structural results about algebraic K-theory and its \'etale sheafification, in particular its approximation by Selmer K-theory. This is based on some recent advances in topological cyclic homology. Joint work with Dustin Clausen.

1:00 pm in 243 Altgeld Hall,Tuesday, February 25, 2020

Geometry of the Minimal Solutions of Linear Diophantine Equations

Papa A. Sissokho (Illinois State Univeristy)

Abstract: Let ${\bf a}=(a_1,\ldots,a_n)$ and ${\bf b}=(b_1,\ldots,b_m)$ be vectors with positive integer entries, and let $\mathcal{S}({\bf a},{\bf b})$ denote the set of all nonnegative solutions $({\bf x},{\bf y})$, where ${\bf x}=(x_1,\ldots,x_n)$ and ${\bf y}=(y_1,\ldots,y_m)$, of the linear Diophantine equation $x_1a_1+...+ x_na_n=y_1b_1+...+y_mb_m$. A solution is called minimal if it cannot be written as the sum of two nonzero solutions in $\mathcal{S}({\bf a},{\bf b})$. The set of all minimal solutions, denoted by $\mathcal{H}({\bf a},{\bf b})$, is called the Hilbert basis of $\mathcal{S}({\bf a},{\bf b})$. The solution ${\bf g}_{i,j}=(b_j{\bf e}_i,a_i{\bf e}_{n+j})$ of the above Diophantine equation, where ${\bf e}_k$ is the $k$th standard unit vector of $\mathbb{R}^{n+m}$, is called a generator. In this talk, we discuss a recent result which shows that every minimal solution in $\mathcal{H}({\bf a},{\bf b})$ is a convex combination of the generators and the zero-solution.

2:00 pm in 345 Altgeld Hall,Tuesday, February 25, 2020

Multiple SLE from a loop measure perspective

Vivian Healey (U Chicago Math)

Abstract: I will discuss the role of Brownian loop measure in the study of Schramm-Loewner evolution. This powerful perspective allows us to apply intuition from discrete models (in particular, the λ-SAW model) to the study of SLE while simultaneously reducing many SLE computations to problems of stochastic calculus. I will discuss recent work on multiple radial SLE that employs this method, including the construction of global multiple radial SLE and its links to locally independent SLE and Dyson Brownian motion. (Joint work with Gregory F. Lawler.)

4:00 pm in 245 Altgeld Hall,Tuesday, February 25, 2020

Counting

Frank Calegari (University of Chicago)

Abstract: What can one say about a system of polynomial equations with integer coefficients simply by counting the number of solutions to these equations modulo primes? We begin with the case of polynomials in one variable and relate this to how the polynomial factors and to Galois theory. We then discuss what happens in higher dimensions, and are led to a conjectural notion of the "Galois group" of an algebraic variety. This will be a colloquium style talk and will be independent of the first talk.

Wednesday, February 26, 2020

2:00 pm in 447 Altgeld Hall,Wednesday, February 26, 2020

Introduction to moduli spaces of sheaves

Sungwoo Nam (Illinois Math)

Abstract: This talk will be an introduction to moduli spaces of sheaves. We will see some motivating questions that lead to the study of moduli spaces of sheaves, and discuss examples telling us why the notion of stability is needed, even in the simplest case of vector bundles on curves. Then I will survey some results on moduli spaces of sheaves on surfaces, especially those of K3 and abelian surfaces and applications to holomorphic symplectic geometry.

4:00 pm in 245 Altgeld Hall,Wednesday, February 26, 2020

Coble

Frank Calegari (University of Chicago)

Abstract: Coble is known (in part) for his work on invariant theory and the geometry of certain of exceptional moduli spaces in low dimension. We discuss the quest to find explicit equations for one particular family of moduli spaces. An important role is played by a number of exceptional geometrical coincidences and also the theory of complex reflection groups. This will be a colloquium style talk and will be independent of the first two talks.

Thursday, February 27, 2020

11:00 am in 241 Altgeld Hall,Thursday, February 27, 2020

The shape of low degree number fields

Bob Hough (Stony Brook University)

Abstract: In his thesis, M. Bhargava proved parameterizations and identified local conditions which he used to give asymptotic counts for $S_4$ quartic and quintic number fields, ordered by discriminant. This talk will discuss results in an ongoing project to add detail to Bhargava's work by considering in addition to the field discriminant, the lattice shape of the ring of integers in the canonical embedding, and by giving strong rates with lower order terms in the asymptotics. These results build on earlier work of Taniguchi-Thorne, Bhargava-Shankar-Tsimerman and Bhargava Harron.

1:00 pm in 464 Loomis ,Thursday, February 27, 2020

Title: Probing heterotic/F-theory duality with a little string theory

Patrick Jefferson (MIT Physics)

Abstract: : The duality between heterotic string theory on a 2-torus and F-theory on an elliptically fibered K3 surface is one of the most groundbreaking results to emerge from the superstring revolution, being intimately related to all other known string dualities. Despite this, a precise map between the moduli spaces of the two theories is only known at special loci. In this talk I will propose a method to compute a general map between moduli spaces. Specifically, I will argue that applying Nekrasov’s instanton calculus to a torus-compactified probe little string theory permits an explicit construction of an elliptic fibration in terms of the Narain moduli of the heterotic string. I will also mention potential applications and future prospects for this work.

2:00 pm in 347 Altgeld Hall,Thursday, February 27, 2020

Tracy Widom Distribution and Spherical Spin Glass (Part I)

Qiang Wu (UIUC Math)

Abstract: We studied the global behavior of eigenvalues of random matrices in previous talks. This time we are going to zoom into the bulk to study some local behavior of eigenvalues. In particular, the edge scaling limit of largest eigenvalue is given by the Tracy-widom (TW) distribution, which as a universal object also appears in some other areas, like growth process, spin system and many other interacting particle systems. Taking GUE as our example, we will try to derive the TW distribution represented as a Fredholm determinant with Airy Kernel. Time permits, we will briefly go through the integral representation of TW, and some universality results even extended to the underlying integrable system for general beta ensembles.

Friday, February 28, 2020

3:00 pm in 347 Altgeld Hall,Friday, February 28, 2020

Eigenvalues on Forms

Xiaolong Han (UIUC Math)

Abstract: Recently there has been a growing interest in eigenvalues on forms. It is much more complicated than eigenvalues on functions but can detect finer geometry. It has applications in detecting length of axes of John ellipsoid of convex body, relating Monopole Floer homology to hyperbolic geometry, and commutator length in hyperbolic geometry. In this talk we will show some basic theory and definitions for eigenvalues on forms, and then provide some intuition for the geometry and applications.

4:00 pm in 141 Altgeld Hall,Friday, February 28, 2020

Arnold-Liouville Theorem

Jungsoo (Ben) Park (UIUC)

Abstract: This talk will be an introduction to fundamental concepts of symplectic geometry. Furthermore, we will delve into the proof of Arnold-Liouville theorem: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liouville–Arnold_theorem.

4:00 pm in 143 Altgeld Hall,Friday, February 28, 2020

Re: Mathematical art and sculpture in connection with the Altgeld/Illini building project

Abstract: Meeting is scheduled for 4-5 p.m.

4:00 pm in 341 Altgeld Hall,Friday, February 28, 2020

How to Tile Your Bathroom: An Extremely Impractical Guide from a Mathematician

Prof. Sean English   [email] (UIUC Math)

Abstract: Tilings have been considered by mathematicians for centuries and by artists for millennia. The main question for tiling problems involves asking if a small number of shapes can be used to cover an entire geometric region without gaps or overlaps. We will briefly talk about some of the history behind tilings, then we will explore many interesting different directions these sorts of problems can take. We will explore some questions as simple as "which regular polygons can tile the plane?" to questions as obscure as "do chickens give rise to a periodic tiling?". Disclaimer: Unless your bathroom is infinite in size, follows spherical or hyperbolic geometry, or has a floor that is more than two dimensional, this talk may not actually be helpful for tiling your bathroom.

Sunday, March 1, 2020

12:30 pm in Salt Fork Center in the Homer Lake Forest Preserve, 2573 S. Homer Lake Road, Homer, IL,Sunday, March 1, 2020

Celebration of the Life of Richard L. Bishop

(Illinois)

Abstract: A celebration of the life of Richard L. Bishop will be held on Sunday, March 1, at the Salt Fork Center in the Homer Lake Forest Preserve, 2573 S. Homer Lake Road, Homer, IL 61849. The family is having an open house from 12:30-3 p.m. with speakers and sharing of memories at 1 p.m. Memorials may be made to the American Mathematical Society, 201 Charles St., Providence, RI 02904 or to the Sierra Club Prairie Group, P.O. Box 131, Urbana, IL 61803.

Monday, March 2, 2020

9:00 am in Altgeld Hall,Monday, March 2, 2020

Math Graduate Open House

Abstract: Visiting Day for students admitted to the Math PhD program and currently living in North America.

3:00 pm in 441 Altgeld Hall,Monday, March 2, 2020

Relations between Spectral Sequences

Liz Tatum (Illinois Math)

Abstract: Consider a ring spectrum E and a spectrum X. The E-based Adams Spectral Sequence is a tool for approximating the homotopy groups $\pi_{*}X$. Depending on the choice of ring spectrum E, the Adams spectral sequence might be easier to compute, but might give a weaker approximation to $\pi_{*}X$. One could ask “If A, B are two different ring spectra, what can an A-based Adams spectral sequence tells us about a B-based Adams spectral sequence”? In the paper “On Relations Between Adams Spectral Sequences, With an Application to the Stable Homotopy of a Moore Space”, Miller proves a theorem addressing this question. In this talk, I’ll introduce some of the tools Miller uses to formulate and prove this theorem, and outline the previously mentioned application.

3:00 pm in 243 Altgeld Hall,Monday, March 2, 2020

Analytic torsions associated with the Rumin complex on contact spheres

Akira Kitaoka (University of Tokyo)

Abstract: The Rumin complex, which is defined on contact manifolds, is a resolution of the constant sheaf of $\mathbb{R}$ given by a subquotient of the de Rham complex. In this talk, we explicitly write down all eigenvalues of the Rumin Laplacian on the standard contact spheres, and express the analytic torsion functions associated with the Rumin complex in terms of the Riemann zeta function. In particular, we find that the functions vanish at the origin and determine the analytic torsions.

4:00 pm in 245 Altgeld Hall,Monday, March 2, 2020

Linear Analysis on Singular Spaces

Hadrian Quan

Abstract: As an undergraduate, one may be introduced to the 3 classic linear differential equations: Laplace’s equation, the heat equation, and the wave equation. Simply trying to solve these equations in different coordinate systems leads to a zoo of different solutions; such variation reflects the strong connection between the geometry of a space, and the behavior of solutions to these PDE on that space. Passing from Euclidean space to more general manifolds, these three equations can be studied whenever our manifold is equipped with the geometric structure of a Riemannian metric. In this talk I will highlight a few of the many surprising theorems exhibiting this connection between the geometry and topology of a manifold and the behavior of solutions to the Laplace, heat, and wave equation. Time permitting, I’ll highlight recent joint work with Pierre Albin of some new phenomena on certain singular spaces.

Tuesday, March 3, 2020

11:00 am in 243 Altgeld Hall,Tuesday, March 3, 2020

Approximating higher algebra by derived algebra

William Balderrama

Abstract: Obstruction theories and spectral sequences from the basic computational tools for accessing complex homotopical structure by means of pure algebra. Many of these are constructed via a careful examination of the relevant notion of ``free resolution''; the difficulties in their construction are then in maintaining sufficient control over these resolutions, as well as in the identification of the relevant obstruction groups. I will describe a general conceptual framework for producing these tools, based on a higher categorical variation on the notion of an algebraic theory, which is easily applicable to a wide variety of situations and provides a direct bridge between homotopical structure and algebraic structure.

2:00 pm in 345 Altgeld Hall,Tuesday, March 3, 2020

Heat kernel of fractional Laplacian with Hardy drift via desingularizing weights

Damir Kinzebulatov   [email] (Universite Laval)

Abstract: We establish sharp two-sided bounds on the heat kernel of the fractional Laplacian, perturbed by a drift having critical-order singularity, using the method of desingularizing weights. This is joint work with Yu.A.Semenov (Toronto) and K.Szczypkowski (Wroclaw).

2:00 pm in 243 Altgeld Hall,Tuesday, March 3, 2020

The avoidance density of (k, l)-sum-free sets

Yifan Jing (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign)

Abstract: Let $\mathscr{M}_{(2,1)}(N)$ be the infimum of the size of the largest sum-free subset of any set of $N$ positive integers. An old conjecture in additive combinatorics asserts that there is a constant $c=c(2,1)$ and a function $\omega(N)\to\infty$ as $N\to\infty$, such that $cN+\omega(N)<\mathscr{M}_{(2,1)}(N)<(c+\varepsilon)N$ for any $\varepsilon>0$. The constant $c(2, 1)$ is recently determined by Eberhard, Green, and Manners, while the existence of $\omega(N)$ is still open. In this talk, we consider the analogue conjecture for $(k,l)$-sum-free sets. We determine the constant $c(k,l)$ for every $(k,l)$, and prove the existence of the function $\omega(N)$ for infinitely many $(k,l)$. The proof uses tools from probabilistic combinatorics, fourier analysis, and nonstandard analysis.

3:00 pm in 243 Altgeld Hall,Tuesday, March 3, 2020

Equivariant elliptic cohomology and 2-dimensional supersymmetric gauge theory

Dan Berwick-Evans (UIUC)

Abstract: Elliptic cohomology can be viewed as a natural generalization of ordinary cohomology and K-theory. However, in contrast to our robust geometric understanding of cohomology and K-theory classes, we do not know of any such description for elliptic cohomology classes. A long-standing conjecture looks to provide such a geometric description using 2-dimensional supersymmetric field theory. I will describe a step forward in this program that relates equivariant elliptic cohomology over the complex numbers to certain supersymmetric gauge theories. This both refines the pre-existing program and sheds light on certain aspects, e.g., the emergence of formal group laws in the language of field theories. I will assume no prior knowledge of either elliptic cohomology or supersymmetric field theory. This is joint work with Arnav Tripathy.

Wednesday, March 4, 2020

2:00 pm in 447 Altgeld Hall,Wednesday, March 4, 2020

Deformation and Obstruction for moduli of sheaves

Lutian Zhao (Illinois Math)

Abstract: In this talk, I’ll introduce the deformation theory for moduli of sheaves,. I’ll give a proof for the description of tangent space of moduli of sheaves and the condition for which this moduli space is smooth. The final goal of this talk is to introduce the construction for Simpson’s moduli space of sheaves.

Thursday, March 5, 2020

11:00 am in 241 Altgeld Hall,Thursday, March 5, 2020

Potential automorphy of Galois representations into general spin groups

Shiang Tang (Illinois Math)

Abstract: Given a connected reductive group $G$ defined over a number field $F$, the Langlands program predicts a connection between suitable automorphic representations of $G(\mathbb A_F)$ and geometric $p$-adic Galois representations $\mathrm{Gal}(\overline{F}/F) \to {}^LG$ into the L-group of $G$. Striking work of Arno Kret and Sug Woo Shin constructs the automorphic-to-Galois direction when $G$ is the group $\mathrm{GSp}_{2n}$ over a totally real field $F$, and $\pi$ is a cuspidal automorphic representation of $\mathrm{GSp}_{2n}(\mathbb A_F)$ that is discrete series at all infinite places and is a twist of the Steinberg representation at some finite place: To such a $\pi$, they attach geometric $p$-adic Galois representations $\rho_{\pi}: \mathrm{Gal}(\overline{F}/F) \to \mathrm{GSpin}_{2n+1}$. In this work we establish a partial converse, proving a potential automorphy theorem, and some applications, for suitable $\mathrm{GSpin}_{2n+1}$-valued Galois representations. In this talk, I will explain the background materials and the known results in this direction before touching upon the main theorems of this work.

3:00 pm in 347 Altgeld Hall,Thursday, March 5, 2020

Fulton's Conjecture, Extremal Rays, and Applications to Saturation

Joshua Kiers   [email] (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill)

Abstract: We begin by recalling a conjecture of Fulton on Littlewood-Richardson coefficients and discussing two generalizations. With a little lemma from algebraic geometry, we find ourselves on the way to naming the extremal rays of the "eigencone'' of asymptotic solutions to the branching question in representation theory of semisimple Lie groups. After giving an algorithm for finding all such extremal rays, generalizing some prior work joint with P. Belkale, we report on progress on the saturation conjecture for types $D_5$, $D_6$, and $E_6$.

4:00 pm in 245 Altgeld Hall,Thursday, March 5, 2020

Plane Trees and Algebraic Numbers

George Shabat (Russian State University for the Humanities and Independent University of Moscow)

Abstract: The main part of the talk will be devoted to an elementary version of the deep relations between the combinatorial topology and the arithmetic geometry. Namely, an object defined over the field of algebraic numbers, a polynomial with algebraic coefficients and only two finite critical values, will be associated to an arbitrary plane tree. Some applications of this construction will be presented, including polynomial Pell equations and quasi-elliptic integrals (going back to N.-H. Abel). The relations with finite groups and Galois theory will be outlined. At the end of the talk the possible generalizations will be discussed, including the dessins d'enfants theory initiated by Grothendieck.

Friday, March 6, 2020

3:00 pm in 347 Altgeld Hall,Friday, March 6, 2020

Screened Sobolev Spaces

David Altizio (UIUC Math)

Abstract: TBA

4:00 pm in 341 Altgeld Hall,Friday, March 6, 2020

TBA

TBA (UIUC Math)

Monday, March 9, 2020

3:00 pm in 243 Altgeld Hall,Monday, March 9, 2020

Semitoric systems: non-simple systems and explicit examples

Joseph Palmer (University of Antwerp)

Abstract: We give an overview of the theory of semitoric integrable systems, which are certain four dimensional integrable systems admitting a circular symmetry. We introduce the classical theory, and discuss recent progress expanding the classification to include systems with multi-pinched fibers and new constructions of systems. The talk should require minimal background and be accessible to those not familiar with integrable systems. Portions of the presented work are joint with S. Hohloch, Y. Le Floch, A. Pelayo, and X. Tang.

3:00 pm in 441 Altgeld Hall,Monday, March 9, 2020

Some applications of tangent categories

Tsutomu Okano (Illinois Math)

Abstract: The cotangent complex formalism is a useful framework for developing obstruction theoretic tools such as Andre-Quillen cohomology. I will present a theorem that identifies the tangent categories of Cat_S, where S is some symmetric monoidal infinity-category. Some more example applications of this formalism will follow.

Tuesday, March 10, 2020

11:00 am in 243 Altgeld Hall,Tuesday, March 10, 2020

$C_2$-equivariant homotopy groups of spheres

Mark Behrens (Notre Dame Math)

Abstract: I will explain how $RO(C_2)$-graded $C_2$-equivariant homotopy groups of spheres can be deduced from non-equivariant stable homotopy groups of stunted projective spaces, and the computation of Mahowald invariants.

2:00 pm in 243 Altgeld Hall,Tuesday, March 10, 2020

Online DP-coloring of graphs

Sasha Kostochka (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign)

Abstract: It is known that the DP-chromatic number (also called correspondence chromatic number), $\chi_{DP}(G)$, and the online chromatic number (also called paintability), $\chi_{P}(G)$, of a graph $G$ are both at least the list chromatic number (also called choosability), $\chi_{\ell}(G)$, and can be significantly larger. The goal of the talk is twofold. First, we present examples of graphs $G$ with $\chi_P(G)>\chi_{DP}(G)$ (but only by $1$). Second, we introduce online DP-coloring of graphs and the online DP-chromatic number, $\chi_{DPP}(G)$. This parameter is an upper bound for both, $\chi_{P}(G)$ and $\chi_{DP}(G)$, but still has good properties of colorings: $\chi_{DPP}(G)$ is at most the degeneracy of $G$ plus $1$, a version of Brooks' Theorem holds for it, and every planar graph is online DP-colorable with $5$ colors.

This is joint work with S.-J. Kim, X. Li and X. Zhu.

3:00 pm in 243 Altgeld Hall,Tuesday, March 10, 2020

The critical filtration of Hurwitz spaces

George Shabat (Russian State University for the Humanities and Independent University of Moscow)

Abstract: Hurwitz spaces, introduced at the end of 19th century, consist of classes of isomorphism of pairs (algebraic curve, rational function on it), where a curve has a fixed genus and a function has a fixed degree. The strata of the filtration, to which the talk is devoted, are formed by the pairs, in which a function has a fixed number of \textit{critical values}. In every Hurwitz space the largest stratum (the \textit{Morse} one) is Zariski-open, while the lowest one consists of pairs in which the function has only three critical values, i.e. of \textit{Belyi pairs}. The considerable part of the talk will be devoted to the strata closest to the lowest ones, i.e. the so-called \textit{Fried families}. The combinatorial, algebro-geometric and arithmetic structures, related to these objects, will be considered, and some examples will be presented.

Wednesday, March 11, 2020

3:30 pm in 341 Altgeld Hall,Wednesday, March 11, 2020

Random walks on graphs and spectral radius: part 1

Anush Tserunyan (UIUC Math)

Abstract: To motivate Kesten's theorem and its version for IRS, we will discuss random walks on graphs, the associated Markov operators, and the spectral radius. We will prove that the spectral radius is equal to the norm of the Markov operator.

5:00 pm in 245 Altgeld Hall,Wednesday, March 11, 2020

Midterm presentations

students (U of I)

6:00 pm in 245 Altgeld Hall,Wednesday, March 11, 2020

Midterm Presentations

students (U of I)

Thursday, March 12, 2020

2:00 pm in 347 Altgeld Hall,Thursday, March 12, 2020

Tracy-Widom distribution and spherical spin glass (Part II)

Qiang Wu (UIUC Math)

Abstract: I will talk about the connection between spherical spin glass(SSK) and random matrices, in particular, the fluctuation of free energy in SSK on low temperatures regime is given by GOE Tracy-Widom distribution.

4:00 pm in 245 Altgeld Hall,Thursday, March 12, 2020

Stability of roll wave solutions in inclined shallow-water flow

Kevin Zumbrun   [email] (Indiana University Bloomington)

Abstract: We review recent developments in stability of periodic roll-wave solutions of the Saint Venant equations for inclined shallow-water flow. Such waves are well-known instances of hydrodynamic instability, playing an important role in hydraulic engineering, for example, flow in a channel or dam spillway. Until recently, the analysis of their stability has been mainly by formal analysis in the weakly unstable or ``near-onset'' regime. However, hydraulic engineering applications are mainly in the strongly unstable regime far from onset. We discuss here a unified framework developed together with Blake Barker, Mat Johnson, Pascal Noble, Miguel Rodrigues, and Zhao Yang for the study of roll wave stability across all parameter regimes, by a combination of rigorous analysis and numerical computation. The culmination of our analysis is a complete stability diagram, of which the low-frequency stability boundary is, remarkably, given explicitly as the solution of a a cubic equation in the parameters of the solution space.

Friday, March 13, 2020

4:00 pm in 141 Altgeld Hall,Friday, March 13, 2020

Poincare duality for singular spaces

Gayana Jayasinghe (UIUC)

Abstract: Poincare duality of manifolds is a classical theorem which can be phrased in terms of the homology and cohomology groups of manifolds. However, when we look at singular spaces, this fails to hold for the usual homology and cohomology groups. In the setting of a certain class of singular spaces know as topological pseudomanifolds, which include orbifolds, algebraic varieties, moduli spaces and many other natural objects, one can extend these groups in order to recover some form of Poincare duality. I'll present how this was achieved by Goresky and MacPherson with their Intersection homology, and by Cheeger using L^2 cohomology and explain how they are related to each other, in similar spirit to the equivalence in the smooth setting. I'll only assume a basic knowledge of homology and cohomology.

Monday, March 23, 2020

3:00 pm in 243 Altgeld Hall,Monday, March 23, 2020

Cancelled

Doğancan Karabaş (Northwestern)

5:00 pm in 241cAltgeld Hall,Monday, March 23, 2020

None

Abstract: No meeting -virtual or physical this week. See however, next week.

Tuesday, March 24, 2020

11:00 am in 243 Altgeld Hall,Tuesday, March 24, 2020

CANCELLED

Christina Osborne (OSU Math)

1:00 pm in https://illinois.zoom.us/j/249415194,Tuesday, March 24, 2020

Borel structures on the space of left orderings

Filippo Calderoni (UIC Math)

Abstract: In this talk I will present some recent results on left-orderable groups and their interplay with descriptive set theory. We shall discuss how Borel classification can be used to analyze the space of left-orderings of a given countable group modulo the conjugacy action. In particular we shall see that if G is a countable nonabelian free group, then the conjugacy relation on its space of left orderings is a universal countable Borel equivalence relation. This is joint work with A. Clay.

2:00 pm in Altgeld Hall,Tuesday, March 24, 2020

with Felix Lediztky

Felix Lediztky (Waterloo)

Abstract: Felix will answer questions by students. https://illinois.zoom.us/j/618149894

4:00 pm in Zoom Meeting https://illinois.zoom.us/j/314999665,Tuesday, March 24, 2020

Error Thresholds for Arbitrary Pauli Noise

Felix Leditzky (Institute for Quantum Computing, University of Waterloo; and Perimeter Institute)

Abstract: The error threshold of a one-parameter family of quantum channels is defined as the largest noise level such that the quantum capacity of the channel remains positive, which in turn guarantees existence of quantum error correction codes. Here, we study the error thresholds of channels arising from probabilistic Pauli errors. To this end, we determine lower bounds on the quantum capacity of these channels by evaluating the coherent information of so-called graph states affected by Pauli noise. Graph states are a subclass of stabilizer states and uniquely defined by a simple undirected graph. The main tools for our results are a) a simplified analysis of the channel action on graph states using the language of homomorphic group actions, and b) using strong generating systems for permutation groups to implement the algorithm in a computationally efficient manner. We provide an extensive analysis of known good codes such as repetition codes and cat codes in the whole Pauli channel simplex. Furthermore, we identify a novel family of quantum codes based on tree graphs with desirable error correction properties. This meeting will be a Zoom meeting! To participate, go to https://illinois.zoom.us/j/314999665 (please watch out for changes)

Wednesday, March 25, 2020

10:00 pm in 245 Altgeld Hall,Wednesday, March 25, 2020

Faculty Meeting with Candidate

Felix Lediztky (Waterloo)

Abstract: The Zoom meeting is https://illinois.zoom.us/j/953087629

Thursday, March 26, 2020

4:00 pm in 245 Altgeld Hall,Thursday, March 26, 2020

Trapping, resonances, and the decay of waves [to be rescheduled Fall 2020]

Jared Wunsch   [email] (Northwestern University)

Abstract: I will discuss some results, new and old, involving the influence of the geometry on the decay of waves. The quantum correspondence principle dictates that at high frequency, the dynamics of particle trajectories should be related to the rate at which the energy of a solution to the wave or Schrödinger equation decays. This relationship is mediated by the existence of resonances, which correspond to states with a finite (but possibly long) lifetime that ultimately decay owing to tunneling effects. I will discuss what we know about the existence and nonexistence of resonances, and focus on some recent results about resonances associated to the subtle effects of diffraction in classical and quantum problems that have singular structures in a metric or potential.

Friday, March 27, 2020

4:00 pm in 341 Altgeld Hall,Friday, March 27, 2020

TBA

TBA (UIUC Math)

Monday, March 30, 2020

3:00 pm in 243 Altgeld Hall,Monday, March 30, 2020

To Be Announced (Cancelled)

Reyer Sjamaar (Cornell)

Abstract: This talk has been cancelled.

5:00 pm in 241 Altgeld Hall,Monday, March 30, 2020

Connes' embedding

David Gao (UIUC)

Abstract: We will have a zoom meeting where David will give an overveiw of the proof. Section 7 will be one week later. https://illinois.zoom.us/j/607953706

Tuesday, March 31, 2020

4:00 pm in Zoom Meeting,Tuesday, March 31, 2020

Quantum Resources What Are They and How Much Are They Worth?

Jamie Sikora (Perimeter Institute, Waterloo, ON)

Abstract: In this talk, I will discuss several natural quantum problems and, in particular, how the problems change as the quantum resources change. I will show how to take an economics perspective to assign a shadow price to each quantum resource. To do this, I will use optimization theory and show that shadow prices are often given for free if you know where to look for them. This will be a Zoom meeting (https://illinois.zoom.us/j/653578028). Faculty host: Marius Junge. A recording of the talk may be accessed at https://mediaspace.illinois.edu/media/t/0_fv18gz5b

Wednesday, April 1, 2020

3:30 pm in https://illinois.zoom.us/j/806582029 (email Anush Tserunyan for the password),Wednesday, April 1, 2020

Random walks on graphs and spectral radius: part 2

Anush Tserunyan (UIUC Math)

Abstract: We will continue discussing random walks on graphs and their spectral radius, computing that the spectral radius of $\mathbb{Z}^d$ is $1$, whereas it is less than $1$ for a $d$-regular tree with $d \ge 3$. We will then discuss the deep and general theorem of Kesten characterizing amenable normal subgroups and derive a couple of striking corollaries: a characterization of finitely generated amenable groups and a rigidity result for the free groups.

4:00 pm in 245 Altgeld Hall,Wednesday, April 1, 2020

A family of number-theoretic directed graphs on the integers

Dana Neidinger

11:00 pm in Altgeld Hall,Wednesday, April 1, 2020

Meeting with Jamie Sikora

Jamie Sikora

Abstract: Instead of lunch with the candidate, we invite for questions and answers, and comments. https://illinois.zoom.us/j/566300666

Thursday, April 2, 2020

11:00 amThursday, April 2, 2020

Poisson imitators and sieve theory

Zarathustra Brady (MIT)

Abstract: I'll describe how sieve theory is actually a question about probability distributions whose low moments agree with the low moments of Poisson distributions. In particular, we can derive Selberg’s “parity problem” without using properties of the Möbius function or the Liouville function - instead, we use the fact that the alternating group forms a subgroup of the symmetric group.

4:00 pm in 245 Altgeld Hall,Thursday, April 2, 2020

To Be Rescheduled Fall 2020

Kevin Purbhoo   [email] (University of Waterloo)

Abstract: To come.

Friday, April 3, 2020

3:00 pm in https://illinois.zoom.us/j/521113604 (email Anush Tserunyan for the password),Friday, April 3, 2020

A dynamical obstruction for classification by actions of TSI Polish groups

Aristotelis Panagiotopoulos (Caltech Math)

Abstract: A big part of mathematical activity revolves around classification problems. However, not every classification problem has a satisfactory solution, and some classification problems are more complicated than others. Dynamical properties such as generic ergodicity and turbulence are crucial in the development of a rich complexity theory for classification problems. In this talk we will review some of the existing anti-classification techniques and we will introduce a new obstruction for classification by orbit equivalence relations of TSI Polish groups; a topological group is TSI if it admits a compatible two side invariant metric. We will then show that the Wreath product of any two non-compact subgroups of $S_{\infty}$ admits an action whose orbit equivalence relation is generically ergodic with respect to orbit equivalence relations of TSI group actions.
This is joint work with Shaun Allison.

4:00 pm in TBA,Friday, April 3, 2020

Integration Bee

MATRIX (UIUC Math)

Monday, April 6, 2020

5:00 pm in Altgeld Hall,Monday, April 6, 2020

Connes embedding

Haojian Li

Abstract: We start with chapter 7. Email Marius for zoom invitation.

Tuesday, April 7, 2020

11:00 am in 243 Altgeld Hall,Tuesday, April 7, 2020

To Be Announced

Ben Antieau (UIC )

2:00 pm in 345 Altgeld Hall,Tuesday, April 7, 2020

**Rescheduled due to COVID-19 campus-shutdown**

Michael Perlmutter   [email] (Michigan State University)

Abstract: To Be Announced

Wednesday, April 8, 2020

3:30 pm in https://illinois.zoom.us/j/806582029 (email Anush Tserunyan for the password),Wednesday, April 8, 2020

Random walks on graphs and spectral radius: part 3

Anush Tserunyan (UIUC Math)

Abstract: We will continue discussing random walks on graphs. In this last talk of the series, we will consider recurrence/transience of random walks, proving that this is determined by whether or not the expectation of the number of visits to a fixed vertex is infinite. We will use it to deduce that the simple random walk on nonamenable Cayley graphs is transient. We will also show that the simple random walk on $\mathbb{Z}^d$ is recurrent if and only if $d \le 2$. As Kakutani put it, "A drunk man will find his way home, but a drunk bird may get lost forever."

Thursday, April 9, 2020

12:00 pm in The Zoom-verse,Thursday, April 9, 2020

Gaps of saddle connection directions for some branched covers of tori

Anthony Sanchez (U. Washington Math)

Abstract: Consider the class of translation surfaces given by gluing two identical tori along a slit. Every such surface has genus two and two cone-type singularities of angle $4\pi$. There is a distinguished set of geodesics called saddle connections that are the geodesics between cone points. We can recover a vector in the plane representing the saddle connection by keeping track of the amount that the saddle connection moves in the vertical and horizontal direction. How random is the set of saddle connections? We shed light to this question by considering the gap distribution of slopes of saddle connections. Zoom Meeting ID: 460 321 230. Email clein for password.

2:00 pm in 243 Altgeld Hall,Thursday, April 9, 2020

This talk is canceled

Steve Dilworth (University of South Carolina)

Abstract: This talk is canceled.

3:00 pm in 347 Altgeld Hall,Thursday, April 9, 2020

**Rescheduled due to COVID-19 campus-shutdown**

Benjamin Braun   [email] (University of Kentucky)

Abstract: TBA

Friday, April 10, 2020

4:00 pm in Zoom Meeting,Friday, April 10, 2020

Python Workshop

Kyle Begovich (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)

Abstract: Kyle will be working at Google as a software engineer at the end of this semester. He'll be running a workshop on Python through Project Euler, a great way to get a jumpstart on learning some of the basics of solving problems through coding. No prior coding experience is needed for this workshop! Project Euler is an online platform for students in any discipline to work on “challenging mathematical/computer programming problems that will require more than just mathematical insights to solve”. In this time of remote work, a platform that is online and well-suited to developing problem-solving techniques can provide a good outlet for learning new skills, developing your analytic senses, and interacting with a community of mathematical thinkers. This seminar will help you set up an environment, discuss common approaches to work on these problems, and walk through some early problems to get you started. Please email undergradseminar@math.illinois.edu for Zoom link.

4:00 pm in 341 Altgeld Hall,Friday, April 10, 2020

TBA

TBA (UIUC Math)

Monday, April 13, 2020

3:00 pm in 243 Altgeld Hall,Monday, April 13, 2020

To Be Announced

Jesse Huang (Illinois)

5:00 pm in Altgeld Hall,Monday, April 13, 2020

Magic square game

Haojian Li (UIUC)

Abstract: We will talk about magic square games, their exact strategies, and their rigidity properties. https://illinois.zoom.us/j/253149081 I will lock the meeting after 15 minutes, contact me if you have to enter later.

Tuesday, April 14, 2020

2:00 pm in Zoom,Tuesday, April 14, 2020

On stability of triangle-free graphs

Felix Clemen (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign)

Abstract: In the first part of this talk we take a look at the structure of $K_{r+1}$-free graphs with number of edges slightly below the Turan number $\mathrm{ex}(n,K_{r+1})$. The Erdos-Simonovits stability theorem states that for all $\epsilon>0$ there exists $\alpha>0$ such that if $G$ is a $K_{r+1}$-free graph on $n$ vertices with $e(G) > \mathrm{ex}(n,K_{r+1}) - \alpha n^2$, then one can remove $\epsilon n^2$ edges from $G$ to obtain an $r$-partite graph. Furedi gave a short proof that one can choose $\alpha=\epsilon$. We give a bound for the relationship of $\alpha$ and $\epsilon$ which is asymptotically sharp as $\epsilon$ goes to $0$. This is joint work with Jozsef Balogh, Mikhail Lavrov, Bernard Lidicky and Florian Pfender.

In the second part of the talk we study graphs with number of edges slightly above the Turan number $\mathrm{ex}(n,K_{r+1})$. What is the minimum number of cliques of such graphs? Lovasz and Simonovits proved that an n-vertex graph with $e(G) > \mathrm{ex}(n,K_{3}) + t$ contains at least $t n/2$ triangles. Katona and Xiao considered the same problem under the additional condition that there are no $s$ vertices covering all triangles. They settled the case $t=1$ and $s=2$. Solving their conjecture, we determine the minimum number of triangles for general $s$ and $t$. Additionally, solving another conjecture of Katona and Xiao, we extend the theory for considering cliques instead of triangles. This is joint work with Jozsef Balogh.

Please E-mail SEnglish@illinois.edu for the Zoom ID and password.

Wednesday, April 15, 2020

3:30 pm in https://illinois.zoom.us/j/806582029 (email Anush Tserunyan for password),Wednesday, April 15, 2020

An obstruction for classification by actions of TSI Polish groups, part 2: proofs

Aristotelis Panagiotopoulos (Caltech Math)

Abstract: In this talk we will over the proof of my recent result (joint with Shaun Allison) that if a $G$-space $X$ is generically unbalanced then its orbit equivalence relation is not classifiable by actions of TSI Polish groups. I will also discuss how one can use this result to show that Morita equivalence between continuous-trace $C^*$ algebras, as well as isomorphism between Hermitian line bundles, are not classifiable by TSI group actions.

Thursday, April 16, 2020

11:00 am in Zoom (email Patrick Allen for the meeting ID and password),Thursday, April 16, 2020

The Wiles defect for Hecke algebras that are not complete intersections

Jeff Manning (University of California at Los Angeles)

Abstract: In his work on modularity theorems, Wiles proved a numerical criterion for a map of rings R->T to be an isomorphism of complete intersections. He used this to show that certain deformation rings and Hecke algebras associated to a mod p Galois representation at non-minimal level were isomorphic and complete intersections, provided the same was true at minimal level. In addition to proving modularity theorems, this numerical criterion also implies a connection between the order of a certain Selmer group and a special value of an L-function. In this talk I will consider the case of a Hecke algebra acting on the cohomology a Shimura curve associated to a quaternion algebra. In this case, one has an analogous map of ring R->T which is known to be an isomorphism, but in many cases the rings R and T fail to be complete intersections. This means that Wiles' numerical criterion will fail to hold. I will describe a method for precisely computing the extent to which the numerical criterion fails (i.e. the 'Wiles defect"), which will turn out to be determined entirely by local information at the primes dividing the discriminant of the quaternion algebra. This is joint work with Gebhard Bockle and Chandrashekhar Khare.

4:00 pm in Virtual Altgeld Hall,Thursday, April 16, 2020

Harnessing quantum entanglement

Laura Mancinska (University of Copenhagen)

Abstract: Entanglement is one of the key features of quantum mechanics. It lies at the heart of most cryptographic applications of quantum technologies and is necessary for computational speed-ups. However, given a specific information processing task, it is challenging to find the best way to harness entanglement and we are yet to uncover the full range of its potential applications. We will see that nonlocal games provide a rigorous framework for studying quantum entanglement and the advantage that it can offer. We will take a closer look at the question of how much entanglement can be needed to play a nonlocal game optimally. We will then use games requiring large amounts of entanglement to build protocols for certifying proper functioning of untrusted quantum devices. https://illinois.zoom.us/j/701331281 The meeting will be locked 4.15, contact me, if you need to get in.

Friday, April 17, 2020

10:00 am in Altgeld Hall,Friday, April 17, 2020

Laura Mancinska

Abstract: https://illinois.zoom.us/j/673360541

4:00 pm in 341 Altgeld Hall,Friday, April 17, 2020

TBA

TBA (UIUC Math)

Monday, April 20, 2020

5:00 pm in Altgeld Hall,Monday, April 20, 2020

On MIP*=RE

Marius Junge (UIUC)

Abstract: We attack section 12 of the paper. Contact me for https://illinois.zoom.us/j/92048143106

Tuesday, April 21, 2020

1:00 pm in Zoom,Tuesday, April 21, 2020

The size-Ramsey number of a path

Louis DeBiasio (Miami University)

Abstract: Given a graph $H$, the size-Ramsey number of $H$ is the minimum $m$ such that there exists a graph $G$ with $m$ edges such that in every $2$-coloring of $G$, there exists a monochromatic copy of $H$. Paul Erdos offered $ \$ $100 simply to determine the correct order of magnitude of the size-Ramsey number of $P_n$, the path on $n$ vertices, and Beck solved this problem by showing that the size-Ramsey number of $P_n$ is between $2.25n$ and $900n$. (Note that a trivial lower bound is $2(n-2)$ and when one first thinks about the problem, it seems surprisingly hard to even improve the lower bound to something like $2.0001n$.) The best lower and upper bounds, after many incremental improvements, stood at $2.5n$ and $74n$, both due to recent work of Dudek and Pralat.

We improve the lower bound to $3.75n$; that is, we prove that every graph with at most $3.75n$ edges has a $2$-coloring such that there are no monochromatic $P_n$'s. We also discuss the $r$-color version of the problem.

Joint work with Deepak Bal.

Please email SEnglish@illinois.edu for the zoom ID and password.

1:00 pm in https://illinois.zoom.us/j/422077317 (email Anush Tserunyan for the password),Tuesday, April 21, 2020

The universal theory of random groups

Meng-Che (Turbo) Ho (Purdue University)

Abstract: Random groups are proposed by Gromov as a model to study the typical behavior of finitely presented groups. They share many properties of the free group, and Knight asked if they also have the same first-order theory as the free group. In this talk, we will discuss a positive result for the first step toward this question, namely the universal theory of random groups. The main tools we use are the machinery developed in Sela’s solution to the Tarski problem.
This is joint work with Remi Coulon and Alan Logan.

Wednesday, April 22, 2020

3:30 pm in https://illinois.zoom.us/j/806582029 (email Anush Tserunyan for password),Wednesday, April 22, 2020

Introduction to 𝓁2-Betti numbers for groups, part 1: Homology

Ruiyuan (Ronnie) Chen (UIUC Math)

Thursday, April 23, 2020

11:00 am in Zoom (email Patrick Allen for the meeting ID and password),Thursday, April 23, 2020

Log-free zero density estimates for automorphic L-functions

Chen An (Duke University)

Abstract: One of the most important topics in number theory is the study of zeros of L-functions. Near the edge of the critical strip, one may show that the number of zeros for certain L-functions is small; such a result is called a zero density estimate. For Dirichlet L-functions, this topic is well understood by the work of Gallagher, Selberg, Jutila, etc. For families of automorphic L-functions, Kowalski and Michel show that the number of zeros near the edge of the critical strip is small on average. The proof uses a large sieve inequality with key objects called pseudo-characters. I will present my recent progress on the refinement of Kowalski-Michel's large sieve inequality, which gives rise to a better zero density estimate for automorphic L-functions.

3:00 pm in 347 Altgeld Hall,Thursday, April 23, 2020

**Rescheduled due to COVID-19 campus-shutdown**

Mee Seong Im   [email] (United States Military Academy)

Abstract: TBA

4:00 pm in Zoom Meeting,Thursday, April 23, 2020

Spring Department Faculty Meeting

Abstract: The Spring Department Faculty Meeting will be held at 4 p.m. via Zoom. Please contact Jane Bergman for login information (jbergman@illinois.edu).

Friday, April 24, 2020

4:00 pm in Zoom Meeting,Friday, April 24, 2020

The Arithmetic of Quadratic Fields

Patrick Allen (UIUC Math)

Abstract: It is often said that the prime numbers are the building blocks of the integers, the precise statement of which is the fundamental theorem of arithmetic: any integer greater than one can be factored uniquely as a product of prime numbers. What if we move beyond the integers? The simplest cases to consider are the analogues of the integers in what are called quadratic fields, which are number systems obtained from adding to the rational numbers the square root of some fixed integer. Whether or not these quadratic integers satisfy the analogue of the fundamental theorem of arithmetic turns out to be very subtle and both what is known and what is not known are rather surprising. Please email drthoma2@illinois.edu for Zoom link.

Monday, April 27, 2020

3:00 pm in 243 Altgeld Hall,Monday, April 27, 2020

To Be Announced

Ralph Klaasse (Université Libre de Bruxelles)

5:00 pm in Virtual Altgeld Hall,Monday, April 27, 2020

More on RIP and compression

Marius Junge (UIUC)

Abstract: We continue looking at 12.2, and finish as far as we can. https://illinois.zoom.us/j/92048143106

Tuesday, April 28, 2020

1:00 pm in Zoom,Tuesday, April 28, 2020

Proof of the Core Conjecture of Hilton and Zhao

Songling Shan (Illinois State Univeristy)

Abstract: Let $G$ be a simple graph with maximum degree $\Delta$. We call $G$ overfull if $|E(G)|>\Delta \lfloor |V(G)|/2\rfloor$. The core of $G$, denoted $G_{\Delta}$, is the subgraph of $G$ induced by its vertices of degree $\Delta$. A classic result of Vizing shows that $\chi'(G)$, the chromatic index of $G$, is either $\Delta$ or $\Delta+1$. It is NP-complete to determine the chromatic index for a general graph. However, if $G$ is overfull then $\chi'(G)=\Delta+1$. Hilton and Zhao in 1996 conjectured that if $G$ is a simple connected graph with $\Delta\ge 3$ and $\Delta(G_\Delta)\le 2$, then $\chi'(G)=\Delta+1$ if and only if $G$ is overfull or $G=P^*$, where $P^*$ is obtained from the Petersen graph by deleting a vertex. This conjecture, if true, implies an easy approach for calculating $\chi'(G)$ for graphs $G$ satisfying the conditions. The progress on the conjecture has been slow: it was only confirmed for $\Delta=3,4$, respectively, in 2003 and 2017. We confirm this conjecture for all $\Delta\ge 4$.

This is joint work with Yan Cao, Guantao Chen and Guangming Jing.

Please Email Sean at SEnglish@illinois.edu for the zoom ID and password

Wednesday, April 29, 2020

2:00 pm in Zoom Meeting,Wednesday, April 29, 2020

Extremal problems on special graph colorings

Xujun Liu (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)

Abstract: Adviser: Alexandr Kostochka Committee: Jozsef Balogh (Chair), Alexandr Kostochka, Mikhail Lavrov, Olgica Milenkovic, and Douglas West Abstract: In this thesis, we study several extremal problems on graph colorings. In particular, we study monochromatic connected matchings, paths, and cycles in 2-edge colored graphs, packing colorings of subcubic graphs, and directed intersection number of digraphs. Please email Jozsef Balogh (jobal@illinois.edu) or Peggy Currid (currid@illinois.edu) for Zoom link, meeting ID, and password.

3:30 pm in https://illinois.zoom.us/j/806582029 (email Anush Tserunyan for password),Wednesday, April 29, 2020

Descriptive combinatorics, distributed algorithms, and the Lovász Local Lemma: proofs

Anton Bernshteyn (CMU Math)

Abstract: Descriptive combinatorics is the study of combinatorial problems (such as graph coloring) under additional topological or measure-theoretic regularity restrictions. It turns out that there is a close relationship between descriptive combinatorics and distributed computing, i.e., the area of computer science concerned with problems that can be solved efficiently by a decentralized network of processors. At the heart of this relationship lies the Lovász Local Lemma—an important tool in probabilistic combinatorics—and its measurable versions. In this talk I will sketch the arguments behind this relationship.

Thursday, April 30, 2020

11:00 am in 241 Altgeld Hall,Thursday, April 30, 2020

Locally Split Galois Representations and Hilbert Modular Forms of Partial Weight One

Eric Stubley (University of Chicago)

Abstract: The Galois representation attached to a p-ordinary eigenform is upper triangular when restricted to a decomposition group at p. A natural question to ask is under what conditions this upper triangular decomposition splits as a direct sum. Ghate and Vatsal have shown that for Galois representations coming from families of p-ordinary eigenforms, the restriction to a decomposition group at p is split if and only if the family has complex multiplication; in their proof, the weight one members of the family play a key role. I'll talk about work in progress which aims to answer similar questions in the case of Galois representations for a totally real field which are split at only some of the primes above p. In this work Hilbert modular forms of partial weight one play a central role; I'll discuss what is known about them and to what extent the techniques of Ghate and Vatsal can be adapted to this situation.

3:00 pm in 347 Altgeld Hall,Thursday, April 30, 2020

**Rescheduled due to COVID-19 campus-shutdown**

Wai Ling Yee   [email] (University of Windsor)

Abstract: To Be Announced

4:00 pm in Zoom Meeting (see abstract),Thursday, April 30, 2020

Quantum information, quantum groups, and counting homomorphisms from planar graphs

David Roberson   [email] (Technical University of Denmark)

Abstract: We introduce a game in which two cooperating parties attempt to convince a referee that two graphs G and H are isomorphic. Classical strategies that win this game correspond to actual isomorphisms of G and H. However, if the two parties are given access to certain quantum mechanical resources (local measurements on a shared entangled state), then they can sometimes win this game even when G and H are not isomorphic. This operationally defined notion of quantum isomorphism turns out to have an elegant algebraic description in terms of magic unitaries, a notion from the theory of quantum groups. Moreover, quantum isomorphism can be completely reformulated in terms of the quantum automorphism group of a graph. We will discuss how these connections allow us to prove that graphs G and H are quantum isomorphic if and only if they admit the same number of homomorphisms from any *planar* graph. This can be viewed as a quantum analog of a classical result of Lovasz from over 50 years ago: graphs G and H are isomorphic if and only if they admit the same number homomorphisms from any graph. Though the connection to quantum groups is crucial, the details of the proof of this result are mostly combinatorial. Please email Jane Bergman (jbergman@illinois.edu) or Jozsef Balogh (jobal@illinois.edu) for Zoom meeting link.

Friday, May 1, 2020

4:00 pm in Zoom Meeting,Friday, May 1, 2020

IGL Fall 2020 Info Session

Alexi Taylor Block Gorman   [email] (UIUC Math)

Abstract: We will be joined by Alexi Block Gorman! She is a third-year PhD student here in the math program, and also the Illinois Geometry Lab's (IGL's) current research manager. She'll be joining us to to talk about applying to the IGL, as well as answering any questions you might have about how the IGL will be run during the next semester. If you're thinking about applying, or even just wondering what exactly the IGL is, this will be an important meeting to join! For a meeting link, please email drthoma2@illinois.edu.

Monday, May 4, 2020

2:00 pm in https://illinois.zoom.us/j/91278653762 (email Anush Tserunyan for password),Monday, May 4, 2020

Probabilistic limit theorems and percolation on Borel graphs

Grigory Terlov (UIUC Math)

Abstract: The first part of this preliminary examination talk I will dedicate to conditional central limit theorems, which, roughly speaking, are statements about sums of conditional random variables converging to the normal distribution. I will provide necessary background for the problem, discuss the approach of studying explicit rates of convergence in dependent settings via Stein's method, and mention current results in application to some examples.
 In the second part, I will introduce a model of bond percolation on locally finite Borel graphs on a standard probability space. This model resembles classical Bernoulli percolation with an addition of some dependencies between the edges. The main motivation for this model is the fact that percolation theory on countable graphs often allows for a construction of subgraphs with desired properties and it is of strong interest in measured group theory and measured graph combinatorics to extend it to Borel graphs. I will discuss a spectacular example of this: a measured group theoretic approach to the Day–von Neumann question, known as the Gaboriau–Lyons theorem.

5:00 pm in Altgeld Hall,Monday, May 4, 2020

More on RIP

(UIUC)

Abstract: 1) Advith will report on a recent paper by Yuen and complexity classes 2) We will organize summer reading courses https://illinois.zoom.us/j/92048143106 contact mjunge for password

Tuesday, May 5, 2020

2:00 pm in Zoom,Tuesday, May 5, 2020

A variant of the Erdos-Renyi random graph process

Pawel Pralat (Ryerson Unversity)

Abstract: We consider a natural variant of the Erdos-Renyi random graph process in which $k$ vertices are special and are never put into the same connected component. The model is natural and interesting on its own, but is actually inspired by the combinatorial data fusion problem that itself is connected to a number of important problems in graph theory. We will show that a phase transition occurs when the number of special vertices is roughly $n^{1/3}$, where $n$ is the number of vertices.

For the Zoom meeting ID and password please email SEnglish@illinois.edu

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

3:30 pm in https://illinois.zoom.us/j/806582029 (email Anush Tserunyan for password),Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Introduction to 𝓁2-Betti numbers for groups, part 2: Group homology

Ruiyuan (Ronnie) Chen (UIUC Math)

Abstract: We will discuss equivariant homology for spaces equipped with a group action, defined as the ordinary homology of the "homotopy quotient" of the action. Group homology is the special case for the trivial action on a point. Time permitting, we will then begin to discuss the theory of (Hattori-Stallings) traces, which provides a better-behaved equivariant analog of torsion-free rank.

Thursday, May 7, 2020

9:00 am in 245 Altgeld Hall,Thursday, May 7, 2020

Final Presentation

Students (U of I)

10:00 am in 245 Altgeld Hall,Thursday, May 7, 2020

Final Presentations

students (U of I)

11:00 am in 245 Altgeld Hall,Thursday, May 7, 2020

Final Presentations

students (U of I)

12:00 pm in 245 Altgeld Hall,Thursday, May 7, 2020

Final Presentations

students (U of I)

1:00 pm in 245 Altgeld Hall,Thursday, May 7, 2020

Final Presentations

students (U of I)

2:00 pm in 245 Altgeld Hall,Thursday, May 7, 2020

Final Presentations

students (U of I)

4:00 pm in 245 Altgeld Hall,Thursday, May 7, 2020

To Be Rescheduled Fall 2020

Sami Assaf   [email] (University of Southern California)

Abstract: To come.

5:00 pm in Online (see abstract for details),Thursday, May 7, 2020

Improving societal governance in the age of AI

Wendy K. Tam Cho   [email] (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)

Abstract: Important insights into societal governance can be gained through an interdisciplinary approach that combines research from many fields, including statistics, operations research, computer science, high performance computing, math, law, and political science. My work integrates insights from all of these disciplines to create a novel approach for analyzing and reforming the redistricting process in the United States. While the development of these computational algorithms is important, understanding the role of this technology and managing its use is critical to improving societal governance in the digital age. To register: https://mailchi.mp/fields.utoronto.ca/2020keyfitzlecture?e=fa128d01a4

Tuesday, May 12, 2020

2:00 pm in Zoom,Tuesday, May 12, 2020

Lower bounds for difference bases

Anton Bernshteyn (Carnegie Mellon University)

Abstract: A difference basis with respect to $n$ is a subset $A \subseteq \mathbb{Z}$ such that $A - A \supseteq [n]$. Rédei and Rényi showed that the minimum size of a difference basis with respect to $n$ is $(c+o(1))\sqrt{n}$ for some positive constant $c$. The precise value of $c$ is not known, but some bounds are available, and I will discuss them in this talk. This is joint work with Michael Tait (Villanova University).

For the Zoom ID and password, please email Sean at SEnglish@illinois.edu.

Wednesday, May 13, 2020

3:30 pm in https://illinois.zoom.us/j/806582029 (email Anush Tserunyan for password),Wednesday, May 13, 2020

Introduction to 𝓁2-Betti numbers for groups, part 3: 𝓁2-homology

Ruiyuan (Ronnie) Chen (UIUC Math)

Abstract: We will first finish our discussion of ordinary group homology by giving an alternative definition via equivariant chain complexes, completely bypassing topology. We will then discuss $\ell^2$-homology, defined by replacing (chain) homotopy quotients by $\ell^2$-completion to Hilbert $\Gamma$-modules. The $\ell^2$-Betti numbers are the von Neumann dimensions of the resulting homology Hilbert $\Gamma$-modules.

Tuesday, May 19, 2020

2:00 pm in Zoom,Tuesday, May 19, 2020

Transversal $C_k$-factors in subgraphs of the balanced blowup of $C_k$

Theodore Molla (University of South Florida)

Abstract: Call a blowup of a graph an $n$-blowup if each part has size $n$. For a subgraph $G$ of a blowup of $F$, we define the minimum partial degree of $G$ to be the smallest minimum degree over all of the bipartite subgraphs of $G$ that correspond to edges of $F$. Johannson proved that when $G$ is a spanning subgraph of the $n$-blowup of a triangle with minimum partial degree at least $2n/3 + n^{1/2}$, then G contains $n$ vertex disjoint triangles. Fischer's Conjecture, which was proved by Keevash and Mycroft in 2015, is a generalization of this result to complete graphs larger than the triangle. Another generalization, conjectured independently by Fischer and Häggkvist, is the following: If $G$ is a spanning subgraph of the $n$-blowup of $C_k$ with minimum partial degree at least $(1 + 1/k)n/2 + 1$, then $G$ contains $n$ vertex disjoint copies of $C_k$ that each intersect all of the $k$ parts. In this talk, we will discuss a proof of an asymptotic version of this conjecture.

This is joint work with Beka Ergemlidze.

Please email Sean English at SEnglish (at) Illinois (dot) edu for the Zoom ID and password.

Tuesday, May 26, 2020

2:00 pm in Zoom,Tuesday, May 26, 2020

Colorful phenomena in discrete geometry and combinatorics via topological methods

Shira Zerbib (Iowa State University)

Abstract: We will discuss two recent topological results and their applications to several different problems in discrete geometry and combinatorics involving colorful settings.

The first result is a polytopal-colorful generalization of the topological KKMS theorem due to Shapley. We apply this theorem to prove a colorful extension of the d-interval theorem of Tardos and Kaiser, as well as to provide a new proof to the colorful Caratheodory theorem due to Barany. Our theorem can be also applied to questions regarding fair-division of goods (e.g., multiple cakes) among a set of players. This is a joint work with Florian Frick.

The second result is a new topological lemma that is reminiscent of Sperner’s lemma: instead of restricting the labels that can appear on each face of the simplex, our lemma considers labelings that enjoy a certain symmetry on the boundary of the simplex. We apply this to prove that the well-known envy-free division theorem of a cake is true even if the players are not assumed to prefer non-empty pieces, whenever the number of players is prime or equal to 4. This is joint with Frederic Meunier.

Please email Sean at SEnglish (at) illinois (dot) edu for the Zoom ID and password.

Tuesday, June 2, 2020

2:00 pm in Zoom,Tuesday, June 2, 2020

Turan numbers for a $4$-uniform hypergraph

Karen Gunderson (University of Manitoba)

Abstract: For any $r\geq 2$, an $r$-uniform hypergraph $\mathcal{H}$, and integer $n$, the Turan number for $\mathcal{H}$ is the maximum number of hyperedges in any $r$-uniform hypergraph on $n$ vertices containing no copy of $\mathcal{H}$. While the Turan numbers of graphs are well-understood and exact Turan numbers are known for some classes of graphs, few exact results are known for the cases $r \geq 3$. I will present a construction, using quadratic residues, for an infinite family of hypergraphs having no copy of the $4$-uniform hypergraph on $5$ vertices with $3$ hyperedges, with the maximum number of hyperedges subject to this condition. I will also describe a connection between this construction and a `switching' operation on tournaments, with applications to finding new bounds on Turan numbers for other small hypergraphs.

Please email Sean at SEnglish@illinois.edu for the Zoom ID and password.

Tuesday, June 9, 2020

2:00 pm in Zoom,Tuesday, June 9, 2020

Packing $(1,1,2,4)$-coloring of subcubic outerplanar graphs

Xujun Liu (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign)

Abstract: For $1\leq s_1 \le s_2 \le \ldots \le s_k$ and a graph $G$, a packing $(s_1, s_2, \ldots, s_k)$-coloring of $G$, is a partition of $V(G)$ into sets $V_1, V_2, \ldots, V_k$ such that for each $1\leq i \leq k$ the distance between any two distinct $x,y\in V_i$ is at least $s_i + 1$. The packing chromatic number, $\chi_p(G)$, of a graph $G$ is the smallest $k$ such that $G$ has a packing $(1,2, \ldots, k)$-coloring. It is known that there are trees of maximum degree 4 and subcubic graphs $G$ with arbitrarily large $\chi_p(G)$. Recently, there was a series of papers on packing $(s_1, s_2, \ldots, s_k)$-colorings of subcubic graphs in various classes. We show that every $2$-connected subcubic outerplanar graph has a packing $(1,1,2)$-coloring and every subcubic outerplanar graph is packing $(1,1,2,4)$-colorable. Our results are sharp in the sense that there are $2$-connected subcubic outerplanar graphs that are not packing $(1,1,3)$-colorable and there are subcubic outerplanar graphs that are not packing $(1,1,2,5)$-colorable. This is joint work with Alexandr Kostochka.

Please contact Sean English at SEnglish@illinois.edu for the Zoom information.

Tuesday, June 16, 2020

2:00 pm in Zoom,Tuesday, June 16, 2020

Longest cycles in $3$-connected hypergraphs and bipartite graphs

Misha Lavrov (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign)

Abstract: Take a bipartite graph $G$ with bipartition $(X,Y)$ such that $|X|=n$ and $|Y|=m \ge n$. In general, this can't possibly be Hamiltonian, but we can still hope to find a cycle of length $2n$, covering $X$. We show that if $G$ is $3$-connected and the minimum degree in $X$ is at least $\max\{n, \frac{m+10}{4}\}$, then such a cycle always exists; this bound is best possible. In the language of hypergraph, this gives a Dirac-type condition for Hamiltonian Berge cycles in $3$-connected hypergraphs.

This is joint work with Alexandr Kostochka, Ruth Luo, and Dara Zirlin.

Please email Sean at SEnglish (at) illinois (dot) edu for the Zoom ID and password.

Tuesday, June 23, 2020

2:00 pm in Zoom,Tuesday, June 23, 2020

Linear cycles of consecutive lengths in linear hypergraphs

Tao Jiang (Miami University)

Abstract: A well-known result of Verstraete states that for each integer $k\geq 2$ every graph $G$ with average degree at least $8k$ contains cycles of $k$ consecutive even lengths, the shortest of which is at most twice the radius of $G$. Besides being interesting on its own, Verstraete's result also immediately implies that the Turan number $\mathrm{ex}(n, C_{2k})$ of the even cycle of length $2k$ is at most $8kn^{1+1/k}$, hence retrieving the classic theorem of Erdos and of Bondy and Simonovits with improved coefficients.

In this talk, we establish two extensions of Verstraete's result for linear cycles in linear $r$-uniform hypergraphs, where $r\geq 3$. A hypergraph is linear if every two edges intersect in at most one vertex. An $r$-uniform linear cycle $C^r_m$ is an $r$-uniform hypergraph consisting a cyclic list of edges $e_1,\dots,e_m$ such that consecutive edges intersect in one vertex and otherwise they are disjoint.

We prove that for all fixed $r\geq 3$, $k\geq 3$, there exists a constant $c_1=c_1(r)$ such that every linear $r$-uniform hypergraph $G$ with average degree $d(G)\geq c_1k$ contains linear cycles of $k$ consecutive even lengths, the shortest of which is at most $2 \frac{ \log n}{\log (d(G)/k)}$. In particular, as an immediate corollary, we retrieve the current best known upper bound on the linear Turan number of $C^r_{2k}$ with improved coefficients.

Furthermore, we show that for any fixed integers $r,k\geq 3$, there exists a constant $c_2=c_2(r)$ such that every $n$-vertex linear $r$-uniform graph with average degree $d(G)\geq c_2 k$, contains linear cycles of $k$ consecutive lengths (even and odd together), the shortest of which has length at most $6\frac{\log n}{\log (d(G)/k)} +5$. Both the degree condition and the shortest length among the cycles guaranteed are tight up to a constant factor. As a corollary it follows that there exists a constant $c_3=c_3(r)$ such that every $r$-uniform linear hypergraph with average degree at least $c_3$ contains an even cycle and an odd cycle of lengths at most $O(\log n)$, which is interesting on its own.

This is joint work with Jie Ma and Liana Yepremyan.

Please email Sean at SEnglish (at) illinois (dot) edu for the Zoom ID.

Thursday, June 25, 2020

5:00 pm in Zoom Meeting (email phierony@illinois.edu for info),Thursday, June 25, 2020

Project Presentations by Uni High School Students

Abstract: This summer the IGL again organized a summer research program for Uni High students (see https://www.istem.illinois.edu/news/uni.high.igl.research.html for a report on last year's program). Twenty-one Uni High students have participated in five research projects envisioned and mentored by our brilliant graduate students Madie Farris, Vaibhav Karve, Heejoung Kim, Bob Krueger and Weihang Wang. The program will conclude on Thursday, June 25th, with presentations by the Uni High participants, in a Zoom meeting starting at 5 PM.

Tuesday, June 30, 2020

2:00 pm in Zoom,Tuesday, June 30, 2020

Variations on twins in permutations

Andrzej Dudek (Western Michigan University)

Abstract: Let $\pi$ be a permutation of the set $[n]=\{1,2,\dots, n\}$. Two disjoint order-isomorphic subsequences of $\pi$ are called twins. How long twins are contained in every permutation? The well known Erdos-Szekeres theorem implies that there is always a pair of twins of length $\Omega(\sqrt{n})$. On the other hand, by a simple probabilistic argument Gawron proved that for every $n\geq 1$ there exist permutations with no twins of length greater than $O(n^{2/3})$. His conjecture states that the latter bound is the correct size of the longest twins guaranteed in every permutation. In this talk we show that asymptotically almost surely a random permutation contains twins of length at least $\Omega(n^{2/3})$, which supports this conjecture. (This was also proved recently by Bukh and Rudenko.) We also discuss several variants of the problem with diverse restrictions imposed on the twins.

This is a joint work with Jaroslaw Grytczuk and Andrzej Rucinski.

For the Zoom ID, please email Sean at SEnglish (at) illinois (dot) edu

Tuesday, July 7, 2020

2:00 pm in Zoom,Tuesday, July 7, 2020

A survey of Berge-Turan hypergraph problems

Cory Palmer (University of Montana)

Abstract: For a graph $F$, we say that a hypergraph $\mathcal{H}$ is a Berge-$F$ if there is an injection $f: V(F) \rightarrow V(\mathcal{H})$ and bijection $f':E(F)\rightarrow E(\mathcal{H})$ such that for every edge $uv\in E(F)$ we have $\{f(u),f(v)\}\subseteq f'(uv)$. Alternatively, $\mathcal{H}$ is Berge-$F$ if we can embed a distinct graph edge into each hyperedge of $\mathcal{H}$ to obtain a copy of $F$. Note that for a fixed $F$ there are many different hypergraphs that are a Berge-$F$ and a fixed hypergraph $\mathcal{H}$ can be a Berge-$F$ for more than one graph $F$.

A hypergraph is Berge-$F$-free if it contains no subhypergraph isomorphic to any Berge-$F$. The maximum number of edges in an Berge-$F$-free $n$-vertex $r$-graph is denoted $\mathrm{ex}_r(n,\textrm{Berge-}F)$. Observe that when $r=2$, then a Berge-$F$ is simply the graph $F$ and then we are investigating the classical Turan function $\mathrm{ex}(n,F)$.

Early work on $\mathrm{ex}_r(n,\textrm{Berge-}F)$ focused on the case when $F$ is a path or a cycle. Results of Gyori, Katona, and Lemons and Davoodi, Gyori, Methuku and Tompkins establish an analogue of the Erdos-Gallai theorem for Berge paths. Gyori and Lemons proved $\mathrm{ex}_r(n,\textrm{Berge-}C_{2k}) = O(n^{1+1/k})$ for $r \geq 3$. This matches the order of magnitude of the bound found in the graph case. They prove the same upper bound for $\textrm{Berge-}C_{2k+1}$-free hypergraphs which is significantly different from the graph case.

In this talk we will survey results on the function $\mathrm{ex}_r(n,\textrm{Berge-}F)$ for various graphs $F$. We will also discuss the connection to other extremal problems and give a number of interesting open problems.

Please contact Sean at SEnglish (at) illinois (dot) edu for the Zoom information.

Tuesday, July 14, 2020

2:00 pm in Zoom,Tuesday, July 14, 2020

On the graph homomorphism density functional

Alexander Sidorenko

Abstract: Let $H$ be a graph with vertices $1,2,\ldots,n$ and edge-set $E$. We associate with it a functional that acts on bounded measurable (symmetric) functions $F: \: [0,1]^2 \to \mathbb{R}$, namely $$ t_H(F) \; = \; \int_{[0,1]^n} \prod_{\{i,j\} \in E} F(x_i,x_j) \: dx_1 dx_2 \cdots dx_n \; . $$ This notion arises from counting copies of $H$ in a large graph $F$.

We will review results and open problems in such areas as
Majorization ($H$ majorizes $G$ when $t_H(F) \geq t_G(F)$ for all $F$),
Positivity of $t_H$.
Convexity of $t_H$.

Please contact Sean English at SEnglish (at) illinois (dot) edu for the Zoom ID.

Tuesday, July 21, 2020

2:00 pm in Zoom,Tuesday, July 21, 2020

Vertex Partitions into an Independent Set and a Forest with Each Component Small

Matt Yancey

Abstract: For $b < 2$, we give optimal sparsity conditions for a graph to be partitionable into two subgraphs, the first one is an independent set and the second has maximum average degree at most $b$. This is joint work with Daniel Cranston.

Please contact Sean English at SEnglish (at) illinois (dot) edu for the Zoom ID.

Tuesday, July 28, 2020

2:00 pm in Zoom,Tuesday, July 28, 2020

11/4-colorability of subcubic triangle-free graphs

Bernard Lidicky (Iowa State University)

Abstract: We prove that every connected subcubic triangle-free graph except for two exceptional graphs on $14$ vertices has fractional chromatic number at most $11/4$. This is a joint work with Zdenek Dvorak and Luke Postle.

Please contact Sean English at SEnglish (at) illinois (dot) edu for the Zoom ID.

Tuesday, August 4, 2020

2:00 pm in Zoom,Tuesday, August 4, 2020

The size-Ramsey number of powers of bounded degree trees

Taisa Martins (Universidade Federal Fluminense)

Abstract: Given a positive integer $s$, the $s$-colour size-Ramsey number of a graph $H$ is the smallest integer $m$ such that there exists a graph $G$ with $m$ edges where in any $s$-colouring of $E(G)$ there is a monochromatic copy of $H$. We prove that, for any positive integers $k$ and $s$, the $s$-colour size-Ramsey number of the $k$th power of any $n$-vertex tree is linear on $n$.

This is a joint work with S. Berger, Y. Kohayakawa, G. S. Maesaka, W. Mendonca, G. O. Mota and O. Parczyk.

Please email Sean English at SEnglish (at) illinois (dot) edu for the Zoom ID.

Thursday, August 6, 2020

10:00 am in Zoom,Thursday, August 6, 2020

Algorithmically Distinguishing Irreducible Characters of the Symmetric Group

Timothy Chow   [email] (IDA, Princeton)

Abstract: Suppose $\chi_\lambda$ and $\chi_\mu$ are two distinct irreducible characters of the symmetric group $S_n$. How hard is it to find a permutation $\pi$ such that $\chi_\lambda(\pi)$ differs from $\chi_\mu(\pi)$? Surprisingly, this natural question seems not to have been considered before in the literature. One might expect that the problem is hard, since even determining whether $\chi_\lambda(\pi)$ is zero or not is in general $\sf NP$-$\sf hard$. A slightly harder problem is, given oracle access to a function that is promised to be an irreducible character of $S_n$, how many queries do we need to determine which irreducible character it is? We give an algorithm that solves this problem with polynomially many queries. The method is purely combinatorial and relies on the Murnaghan-Nakayama rule. This is joint work with Jennifer Paulhus. Please email Colleen at cer2 (at) illinois (dot) edu for the Zoom ID and password.

Tuesday, August 11, 2020

2:00 pm in Zoom,Tuesday, August 11, 2020

New Upper Bounds on Generalized Ramsey Numbers

Emily Heath (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign)

Abstract: A $(p,q)$-coloring of a graph $G$ is an edge-coloring of $G$ in which each $p$-clique contains edges of at least $q$ distinct colors. We are interested in the function $f(n,p,q)$, first introduced by Erdos and Shelah, which is the minimum number of colors needed for a $(p,q)$-coloring of the complete graph $K_n$. The best-known general upper bound on $f(n,p,q)$ was given by Erdos and Gyarfas in 1997 using a probabilistic argument. Since then, improved bounds in the case where $p=q$ have been obtained only for $p = 4$ and $p = 5$. In this talk, I will introduce a general strategy for finding new constructive upper bounds and explain how to apply this technique to obtain improved bounds for $p=6$ and $p=8$.

This is joint work with Alex Cameron.

Please email Sean English at SEnglish (at) illinois (dot) edu for Zoom details.

Thursday, August 13, 2020

3:00 pm in Zoom,Thursday, August 13, 2020

Gröbner geometry of Schubert polynomials through ice

Anna Weigandt   [email] (University of Michigan)

Abstract: The geometric naturality of Schubert polynomials and the related combinatorics of pipe dreams was established by Knutson and Miller (2005) via antidiagonal Gröbner degeneration of matrix Schubert varieties. We consider instead diagonal Gröbner degenerations. In this dual setting, Knutson, Miller, and Yong (2009) obtained alternative combinatorics for the class of vexillary matrix Schubert varieties. We will discuss general diagonal degenerations, relating them to an older formula of Lascoux (2002) in terms of the 6-vertex ice model. Lascoux's formula was recently rediscovered by Lam, Lee, and Shimozono (2018), as "bumpless pipe dreams." We will explain this connection and discuss conjectures and progress towards understanding diagonal Gröbner degenerations of matrix Schubert varieties. This is joint work with Zachary Hamaker and Oliver Pechenik. Please email Colleen at cer2 (at) illinois (dot) edu for the Zoom ID and password.

Thursday, August 20, 2020

3:00 pm in Zoom,Thursday, August 20, 2020

To Be Announced

Benjamin Braun   [email] (University of Kentucky)

Abstract: To Be Announced

Thursday, August 27, 2020

4:00 pm in 245 Altgeld Hall,Thursday, August 27, 2020

To Be Announced

Noga Alon   [email] (Princeton University)

Abstract: To come.

Thursday, September 3, 2020

4:00 pm in 245 Altgeld Hall,Thursday, September 3, 2020

To Be Announced

Marius Junge   [email] (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)

Abstract: To come.

Thursday, September 10, 2020

6:00 pm in Zoom,Thursday, September 10, 2020

To Be Announced

Dominic Searles   [email] (University of Otago)

Abstract: To Be Announced

Thursday, September 24, 2020

3:00 pm in To be announced,Thursday, September 24, 2020

Fall 2020 Department Faculty Meeting

Abstract: The Fall 2020 Department Faculty Meeting will be held at 3 p.m. Please check back for more details.

Thursday, October 22, 2020

12:00 pm in Silvercreek Restaurant, Garden Room,Thursday, October 22, 2020

23rd Annual Math Dept. Retiree Luncheon

Abstract: An invitation will be sent in September, with more information posted here.

4:00 pm in 425 Altgeld Hall,Thursday, October 22, 2020

To Be Announced

Ralf Hiptmair   [email] (ETH Zurich)

Abstract: To come.

Thursday, October 29, 2020

3:00 pm in Zoom,Thursday, October 29, 2020

To Be Announced

Chris Fraser   [email] (University of Minnesota)

Abstract: To Be Announced

Thursday, November 5, 2020

4:00 pm in 245 Altgeld Hall,Thursday, November 5, 2020

To Be Announced

Mikhail Ostrovskii   [email] (St. John's University)

Abstract: To come