Department of

Mathematics


Seminar Calendar
for events the day of Tuesday, September 29, 2020.

     .
events for the
events containing  

(Requires a password.)
More information on this calendar program is available.
Questions regarding events or the calendar should be directed to Tori Corkery.
     August 2020           September 2020          October 2020    
 Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa   Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa   Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa
                    1          1  2  3  4  5                1  2  3
  2  3  4  5  6  7  8    6  7  8  9 10 11 12    4  5  6  7  8  9 10
  9 10 11 12 13 14 15   13 14 15 16 17 18 19   11 12 13 14 15 16 17
 16 17 18 19 20 21 22   20 21 22 23 24 25 26   18 19 20 21 22 23 24
 23 24 25 26 27 28 29   27 28 29 30            25 26 27 28 29 30 31
 30 31                                                             

Tuesday, September 29, 2020

11:00 am in Zoom,Tuesday, September 29, 2020

Partitions into primes in arithmetic progression

Amita Malik (AIM)

Abstract: In this talk, we discuss the number of ways to write a given integer as a sum of primes in an arithmetic progression. While the study of asymptotics for the number of ordinary partitions goes back to Hardy and Ramanujan, partitions into primes were recently re-visited by Vaughan. If time permits, we compare our results with some known estimates in special cases and discuss connections to certain classical results in analytic number theory.

2:00 pm in Zoom,Tuesday, September 29, 2020

Ramsey graphs and anti-concentration

Matthew Kwan (Stanford University)

Abstract: Anti-concentration inequalities provide limits on the extent to which random variables can be concentrated: for example, they commonly give uniform upper bounds on the probability that a random variable takes any particular value. In this talk I'll discuss some of the many connections between anti-concentration and combinatorics, initially focusing on applications to Ramsey graphs but also touching on a few other topics such as the polynomial Littlewood-Offord problem and permanents of random matrices.

Please Email Sean at SEnglish (at) illinois (dot) edu for Zoom information.