Department of

Mathematics


Seminar Calendar
for events the day of Friday, October 9, 2020.

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Friday, October 9, 2020

1:00 pm in Zoom,Friday, October 9, 2020

To Be Announced

Ryan Mitchell McConnell (UIUC Math)

Abstract: TBA

4:00 pm in Zoom (email ruiyuan at illinois for info),Friday, October 9, 2020

T-convex T-differential fields and their immediate extensions (Part 2)

Elliot Kaplan (UIUC Math)

Abstract: Continuing from last week, I will discuss T-derivations and strict extensions, define "eventual smallness", and sketch a proof of the main result: if T is polynomially bounded, then any T-convex T-differential field has an immediate strict extension which is spherically complete.

4:00 pm in Zoom,Friday, October 9, 2020

Stability theorems in geometry

Sambit Senapati

Abstract: We take a look at stability results arising in different geometric contexts, including one for group actions and one for foliations (Reeb-Thurston). We follow this up with a theorem concerning the stability of symplectic leaves in Poisson manifolds. Is there any common framework connecting all these geometric structures? Is there a meta-stability result that encompasses all of these? Come find out on Friday. Note- This will be an introductory talk; in particular I won't be assuming familiarity with Poisson geometry for the most part.