Department of

Mathematics


Seminar Calendar
for events the day of Tuesday, March 2, 2021.

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Tuesday, March 2, 2021

11:00 am in Zoom,Tuesday, March 2, 2021

On the Liouville function at polynomial arguments

Joni Teravainen (Oxford)

Abstract: Let $\lambda$ be the Liouville function and $P(x)$ any polynomial that is not a square. An open problem formulated by Chowla and others asks to show that the sequence $\lambda(P(n))$ changes sign infinitely often. We present a solution to this problem for new classes of polynomials $P$, including any product of linear factors or any product of quadratic factors of a certain type. The proofs also establish some nontrivial cancellation in Chowla and Elliott type correlation averages.

2:00 pm in Zoom,Tuesday, March 2, 2021

Sparse random graphs with overlapping community structure

Sam Petti (Harvard University)

Abstract: In this talk we introduce two different random graph models that produce sparse graphs with overlapping community structure and discuss community detection in each context. The Random Overlapping Community (ROC) model produces a sparse graph by constructing many Erdos Renyi random graphs (communities) on small randomly selected subsets of vertices. By varying the size and density of these communities, ROC graphs can be tuned to exhibit a wide range normalized of closed walk count vectors, including those of hypercubes. This is joint work with Santosh Vempala. In the second half of the talk, we introduce the Community Configuration Model (CCM), a variant of the configuration model in which half-edges are assigned colors and pair according to a matching rule on the colors. The model is a generalization of models in the statistical physics literature and is a natural finite analog for classes of graphexes. We describe a hypothesis testing algorithm that determines whether a graph came from a community configuration model or a traditional configuration model. This is joint work with Christian Borgs, Jennifer Chayes, Souvik Dhara, and Subhabrata Sen.

For Zoom information, please contact Sean at SEnglish (at) illinois (dot) edu.